Posts Tagged ‘WHDI’

CCW/Satcon 2013: Wireless Connectivity – It’s Here!

Wireless display connectivity has been the goal of inventors for several decades. Now, several manufacturers are now shipping or preparing to roll out wireless connectivity products for projectors, monitors and document cameras in 2013. This presentation, which always sells out at InfoComm, will compare/contrast the different systems being advanced for wireless high bit rate video, including WHDI, Wireless HD, and Wi-Fi (Intel WiDi, Apple AirPlay).- See more at: http://www.ccwexpo.com/sessions_detail.asp?id=3421#sthash.WokyKSFx.dpuf

Presented by: Pete Putman, CTS, ISF, KT2B

InfoComm 2013 in the Rear View Mirror

Last week marked my 20th consecutive trip to InfoComm and it was a hectic time in Orlando. I got in Sunday night and spent most of Monday setting up equipment for my four classes and presentations at InfoComm, including two Super Tuesday sessions (Future Trends, Things You Never Thought About) while I was also co-teaching an all-day Super Tuesday session on RF and Wireless Trends.

Wednesday morning brought a 2-hour class on digital video, while my Thursday morning class covered and demonstrated a variety of wireless display and video connectivity systems (none of which used WiFi, by the way). That’s about ten hours’ worth of teaching, and it does take its toll on your voice!

As a result, I didn’t spend a lot of time on the show floor. Even so, I spotted a few trends that are impacting the pro AV industry and will dramatically re-shape it by the end of this decade.

First off, attendance at classes this year was strong, with more than a few sessions selling out. The transition from analog to digital AV is in full swing, and there’s plenty to be learned. More than half the attendees in my classes came from the higher education channel and were either in the process of upgrading to digital signal switching and distribution, or about to embark on that arduous task within the next six months.

Here's the wireless Nook HD+ in action. Even in a high-level RF environment (lots of WiFi activity), it worked flawlessly.

Here’s the wireless Nook HD+ in action. Even in a high-level RF environment (lots of WiFi activity), it worked flawlessly.

 

And here's what the Nook HD+ screen looked like. It's mirroring the PowerPoints showing on the main projection screens.

And here’s what the Nook HD+ screen looked like. It’s mirroring the PowerPoints showing on the main projection screens.

There was intense interest in my wireless AV class, which for the first time featured actual products that you can buy now. Clint Hoffman and his crew at Kramer Electronics worked hard to get me a production model of the company’s new KW-11 WHDI transceiver kit, which I promptly installed in my home-made wireless Nook HD+ tablet. This 6 GHz system was used to deliver PowerPoints and 1080p/60 clips from Skyfall as I walked around the 150+ attendees. It worked like a champ!

Peerless AV also provided me with their two-channel WHDI linking system, which we used to transmit 1080p signals to a Sharp 80-inch LCD TV in the corner of the classroom. That same TV was simultaneously receiving low-power ATSC signals on channel 23 from MELD Technologies’ Pico Broadcaster white space system.

On the other side of the room, DVDO’s 60 GHz WiHD Air product was sending clips from Men in Black III from a Panasonic Blu-ray player to the house projection system. And Jim Venable and Alan Ruberg from the Wireless Speaker and Audio Association were demonstrating 5.1-channel wireless surround audio playback of House of Flying Daggers. If anyone in the crowd had doubts about wireless high-bandwidth AV connectivity being real, they were quickly dispelled.

In my Future Trends talk on Tuesday, I identified inexpensive, large LCD displays as growing market disruptors. That was obvious when I walked the show floor, where booths were stuffed with big LCD screens, including some 4K models. Sharp had their big glass on display and also spotlighted their new 32-inch 4K LCD monitors, powered by IGZO backplanes. Samsung, LG, Sony, Panasonic, Planar, NEC, and others made “big LCD” the focal point of their booths.

Not surprisingly, most of the projector manufacturer booths were smaller this year than last. But those that had ‘em to show made sure their lamp-free projectors were located front and center. Lamp-free projection is a big deal now and takes on even more importance with the threat from large LCDs. Panasonic, Optoma, Casio, Sony, projectiondesign, Vivitek, and Mitsubishi all had impressive demos of LED, laser, and hybrid projectors. (Oddly, I walked through the BenQ booth a few times but couldn’t locate their laser DLP models.) Keep an eye on this battle – it’s only going to intensify as more end-users consider the move to “big LCD.”

As for 4K, there were lots of discussions about the pros and cons at the show. It has been pointed out on more than one occasion that we’ve yet to see a single 4K display interface; HDMI or DisplayPort. The trick now is to use several HDMI connections to get data to the screen, but that’s not practical in the long term.

With the pending release of HDMI 2.0 standards and perhaps some more aggressive promotion by VESA of Display Stream (up to 25 Gb/s data rates), I expect all of that to change by next year’s InfoComm. There is considerable demand in the commercial AV space for higher display resolution, both in single screens and tiled displays. Think of process control, command and control, virtual reality, geophysical mapping, and military surveillance as logical candidates.

One of the more intriguing discussions came during Scott Sharer’s closing Super Tuesday session. Fellow panelist Bill Nattress, a principal at Shen Milsom Wilke in Chicago, talked about the pending demise of the conventional conference room and meeting room in favor of ad hoc, no-wall meeting spaces. How will people present there? Projectors aren’t a likely candidate. Perhaps tablets, which will certainly get bigger? Large LCD screens on roll-around stands?

And how will we control AV playback in these spaces? Most likely with advanced gesture control and voice recognition. The two go hand-in-hand, in my opinion, and we are going to see plenty of finished products by 2020; perhaps even sooner. Look for the era of the “touchless” touch screen to start soon.

So, there you have it: 4K, large cheap LCDs, lamp-free projection, wireless high-bandwidth connectivity, faster multifunction interfaces, and gesture/voice control. Keep your eyes on those trends for the rest of the year and I’ll look forward to seeing you in one of my classes next June in Las Vegas!

CES 2013: From Hype to Ho-Hum in Minutes

Here we go again ! (Sigh…)

Here we go again ! (Sigh…)

Things are booming in the world of consumer electronics, regardless of the state of the world’s economy. You needed no additional proof beyond the enormous turnout at last week’s International CES, which was in excess of 150,000, according to official press releases. Even if you apply the Kell factor, that’s still a huge turnout – at least 120,000.

I’ve used an easy rule to determine attendance: How long it takes to catch a cab at the end of the first two days of the show. 10 minutes? Light turnout. 20 minutes? Respectable turnout. 40 minutes or more? Now, that’s a crowd!

I spent the equivalent of three full days at the show, scrambling back and forth between strip hotels and the convention center, capturing over 1200 videos and photos along the way. After a while, it all started to blur together. I mean; how many 110-inch TVs do you have to see before the “awe” wears off? How many tablets will you run across before you swear never to touch another one?

This year’s edition of show was characterized by a level playing field across many technologies. No longer do the Japanese and Koreans have an exclusive right to “first to market.” Their neighbors across the sea are now just as technically competent, if not more so.

hisense

Hisense’s “Big Bertha” uses the same glass as TVs shown by TCL, Samsung, and Westinghouse Digital.

syyworth

Everybody (and their brother) had an 84-inch 4K TV at the show. (Yawn…)

Case in point: The 110-inch 4K LCD TVs shown at CES (I counted four of them, including one in the Samsung booth) all use glass from a Chinese LCD fab known as China Star Optoelectronics Technology, which is a three-year old joint venture between TCL, Samsung, and the local government of Shenzen.

Never heard of them? You will. What’s even more amazing is that their Gen 8.5 LCD fab is (according to an industry insider I spoke to) more efficiently used when cutting two 98-inch LCD panels at the same time. Those are huge cuts, and given China’s predilection for market dominance, we may see rapid price drops in 4K TVs across all sizes by the end of 2013.

Speaking of 4K (UHDTV); everyone had it. And I mean everyone! Sony, Panasonic, LG, Samsung, Toshiba, Sharp, Westinghouse, Skyworth, TCL, Hisense, Haier – wait! You never heard of those last four companies? The last three had enormous booths at the show, and Hisense showed five different models of 4K TVs – 50, 58, 65, 84, and 100 inches. That’s more than anyone else had.

In a significant marketing and PR coup, TCL managed to get their 110-inch 4K TV featured in Iron Man III, which debuts in May. That’s the sort of promotional genius that Sony and Panasonic used to pull off. But there are new guys on the block now, and they’re playing for keeps. The steady decline of the Japanese TV industry and continuing financial woes of its major players are all the proof you need.

4koled tv

So – who was REALLY “first” to show a 4K 56-inch OLED TV? Sony, or…

panasonic

…Panasonic, who also claimed they were the “first?” (Maybe it was a matter of minutes?)

Interestingly, Sony’s booth signs identified this display as the “world’s first and largest OLED TV.” Puzzling, as it clearly wasn’t the first OLED TV ever shown, and just down the hall, Panasonic was showing its 56-inch OLED TV, the “world’s largest 4K OLED created by printing technology.” Both companies need to get out of their booths more often!

Panasonic, who emphatically renewed their commitment to plasma at CES (despite a continued decline in plasma TV sales worldwide), clearly wanted to show they had a second act ready when plasma eventually bites the bullet. The company is also a major player in IPS LCD, manufacturing LCD TVs in sizes to 65 inches that are every bit as good anything LG cranks out.

Speaking of LG…the heavy emphasis on 3D found in last year’s booth was all but gone this year. Yes, the enormous passive 3DTV wall that greeted visitors at the entrance was still there. And there were a few passive 3D demos scattered throughout the booth. But the more impressive exhibit featured a wall of curved 55-inch OLED TVs. (Why would anyone need a curved TV? You’re probably asking. Well, why would anyone need most of the stuff you see at CES?)

LG also showcased a unique product – a 100” projector screen illuminated by an ultra-short-throw laser projector. LG billed it as the world’s largest wall-mount TV (for now) and it’s known as “Hecto.” The projector uses laser diodes (presumably with DLP technology; that wasn’t mentioned) to illuminate that screen at a distance of just 22 inches.

lg oled tv

It’s bad enough that LG shows 55-inch OLED TVs we can’t buy yet. Now, they have curved OLED TVs we can’t buy yet. (Drool…)

3d tv

Got two people who want to watch two different 3D TV programs at the same time? No problem for Samsung!

Back down the hall, LG’s neighbor Samsung also showed a 55-inch curved OLED TV (just one) and a couple of company representatives were surprised to hear that LG had a bevy of them. (I repeat my observation about booth personnel who need to get out more.) Samsung did have a clever demo of an OLED TV showing simultaneous 2K programming – simply change a setting on the 3D glasses and you could watch one or the other show. (TI showed this same trick years ago with DLP RPTVs by switching left eye and right information.)

Samsung did have an 85-inch 4K LCD TV that wasn’t duplicated anywhere else on the show floor, and as far as I can tell, it’s a home-grown product. But given the company’s investment in China Star and its shifting emphasis on AM OLED production, I would not be surprised to see Samsung sourcing more of its LCD glass from China in the near future.

Sharp’s booth intrigued me. Here’s a company on the verge of bankruptcy that was showing a full line of new Quattron LCD TVs, along with “Moth Eye” anti-glare first surface glass. Moth Eye glass preserves high contrast and color saturation, but minimizes reflections in a similar way to a moth’s eye; hence the name. Sharp also had impressive demos of flexible OLEDs and a gorgeous 32-inch 4K LCD monitor.

IGZO was also heralded all around the booth. Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide is a new type of semiconductor layer for switching LCD pixels that consumes less power, passes more light, and switches at faster speeds. Many LCD manufacturers (and OLED manufacturers, too) are working on IGZO, but Sharp is closer to the finish line than anyone else – and that may be the salvation of the company, along with an almost-inevitable orderly bankruptcy.

IGZO is why Terry Gou, the chairman of Hon Hai Precision Industries, wants to buy a piece of Sharp – about 10%, to be exact. He’s looking for a source of VA glass for Apple’s tablets and phones (Hon Hai owns Foxconn, who manufactures these products.) And if Sharp can’t get its financial house in order, he might wind up making a bid for the entire company. (“Never happen!” you say. “The Japanese government wouldn’t allow it.” Well, these are different times we live in, so never say “never!”)

igzo

Sharp may not be able to balance their books, but they still know how to manufacture some beautiful displays.

tlc

It goes without saying that Tony Stark would have a 110-inch TV, right?

On to the Chinese. They showed 4K, 84-inch and 110-inch LCD glass cuts, gesture recognition, clever LED illumination systems, 3D, smart TVs – basically, everything the Japanese and Koreans were showing. Hisense had a spectacular demo of a transparent 3D LCD TV, along with something called U-LED TV. The explanation of this by the booth representative was so ambiguous that I’ll leave it at an enhanced method of controlling the backlight for improved contrast.

I had heard from an industry colleague that Hisense’s XT880-series 4K TV would have rock-bottom retail prices, but couldn’t confirm this from booth personnel. (Think of $2,000 for a 50-inch 4K TV.) The company’s gesture recognition demo wasn’t nearly as impressive – it’s powered by Israel-based EyeSight – but clearly shows that Hisense is just as far along in refining this feature as anyone else.

TCL had demonstrations of high-contrast 4K TVs with amazingly deep blacks; as good as anything I’ve seen from LG and Samsung. They also had a demonstration of autostereo 3D at the back of their booth, very close to Toshiba (who was showing the same thing). Haier had that now-ubiquitous 4K LCD TV prominently featured in their booth, along with smart TVs and what must have been several dozen tablets. Meanwhile, Skyworth’s booth in the lower south hall showcased yet another 84-inch 4K TV.

rca

RCA’s got the first tablet with an integrated ATSC/MH tuner, and it runs Windows 8.

tv antennas

TV antennas are passe? NOT!

celluons

Celluon’s laser-powered virtual keyboard works on any surface. TI had a pair connected to picoprojectors in their suite.

Vizio’s suite at the Wynn featured 80-inch, 70-inch, and 60-inch LCD TVs using the Sharp Gen 10 glass, and they looked impressive. One version of the 70-inch set is already selling below $2,000, and the 80-incher will come in (for now) at just under $4,500. Vizio also had three new 4K TVs in 55-inch, 65-inch, and 70-inch sizes, but no pricing was announced yet. (Everyone is sitting on their hands waiting for the other guy to price his 4K TVs!)

There was obviously a lot more to CES than televisions. Vizio has a new 11.6” tablet with 1920×1080 resolution that runs Windows 8 with a AMD Z-60 processor. Panasonic showed a prototype 20-inch 4K (3840×2560) tablet using IPS-alpha glass. It also runs Windows 8 with an Intel Corei5 CPU and has multi-touch and stylus input. And RCA had a cool 8-inch tablet (Win 8 OS) that incorporates an ATSC receiver and small antenna. It can play back both conventional 8VSB and MH broadcasts.

Silicon Image had a kit-bashed 7” Kindle tablet running their new UltraGig 6400 60 GHz transmitter, delivering 2K video to a bevy of LCD TVs. They also showed a new image scaling chip to convert 2K to 4K, along with the latest version of InstaPrevue. The latter technology lets you see what’s on any connected HDMI input with I-frame thumbnails of video and still images.

sillcon

Silicon Image’s new UltraGig 6400 TX chip connects this full HD Kindle tablet to an HDTV at 60 GHz.

speech

Conexant’s powerful speech processing chips can filter out any background noise while you “command” your smart TV.

omeks

Omek’s gesture control demo was easily the most impressive at the show.

Over in the LV Hotel, Conexant dazzled with a demonstration of adaptive background noise filtering to improve the reliability of voice control systems for televisions. The demo consisted of a nearby loudspeaker playing back an art lecture while commands for TV operation were spoken. A graphical representation showed how effectively the background noise was filtered out completely. The second demo had a Skype conversation running with a TV on in the background and the remote caller walking around the room. I never heard one peep from the TV, and the remote caller was always intelligible.

A few floors down, Omek (yet another Israel-based gesture recognition startup) had perhaps the best demo of gesture control at the show. Their system captures 22 points of reference along your hands, allowing complex gesture control using simple, intuitive finger and wrist movement. (No flailing of arms was necessary). I watched as an operator at a small computer monitor pulled a virtual book from a shelf and flipped through its pages, and also selected a record album, removed the record from its sleeve, and placed it on a virtual turntable. I was even treated to a small marionette show!

At the Renaissance, Prime Sense had numerous exhibits that all revolved around their new, ultra-compact 3D camera design. One demo by Shopperception involved boxes of cereal on a shelf. As you picked one up, the sensors would flash a coupon offer for that cereal to your tablet or phone, or suggest you buy a larger, more economical size instead of two boxes.

Nearby, Covii had one of those “You Are Here” shopping mall locator maps that operated with touchless sensing to expand and provide more detail about any store you were interested in, including sales and promotions. And Matterport had a nifty 3D 360-degree camera that could scan and provide a 3D representation of any room in about one minute. You could then rotate and turn the views in any direction.

hzo

Do not – repeat, DO NOT try this at home with your tablet!

hybird

A hybrid low rider? With a 500-watt sound system? Who’d a thunk it?

gps

Wear this Garmin GPS watch and nobody can ever tell you to “get lost!”

HzO was back with another amazing demo of their WaterBlock waterproofing system. They had a tablet computer sitting in a continuous shower, and also dunked it in a fish tank. Additional demos included dropping smart phones in a bowl of beer and other mysterious liquids. The water infiltrates all spaces but has no effect on operation – you just drip-dry the device once extracted from water. (How do you get rid of the beer smell, though?)

There was an HDMI pavilion at the show, but I was more interested in the goings-on at the DisplayPort exhibit. VESA representatives showed me a single-channel DP connection from a smart phone to a TV for gaming and playing back video, all over a super-thin connecting cable. The powers that be at VESA are also talking about upping the data rates for DisplayPort (currently about 18 Gb/s) to accommodate higher-resolution TVs.

Right now, DP uses an uncompressed data coding method. But there is now discussion of applying a light compression algorithm (tentatively called DisplayStream) that would enable data rates to go much higher – more like 25 Gb/s. (DisplayPort can currently handle 3840×2160 pixels with 10-bit color and a 60-Hz refresh rate.)

I was surprised at the number of devices at the show that support HDMI, and expected more support for DP given its ability to handle higher data rates and its Thunderbolt data layer overlay. It may still be early in the game – the venerable VGA connector is on its way out starting this year, and manufacturers of laptops, tablets, and phones are still debating which digital interface to hitch their horses to.

ces

No, this is not a typical CES attendee. But it’s how all of us feel after three days at the show.

panasonic

Panasonic’s 20-inch 4K offering is the Rolls-Royce of tablets. (So who needs a notebook!)

inada

Suffice it to say that this was a VERY popular booth at CES…

mattress

…as was this one. Sealy lets you control your mattress settings from your iPad. (Hey, it’s CES!)

Let’s wrap things up with a discussion of ultrabooks. Intel’s booth prominently featured a full line of these next-gen notebooks, although several of the models on display weren’t nearly as thin as I’d expect an ultrabook to be. Shipments of “ultras” in 2012 were only about half of what was forecast.

The reason? Tablets. Vizio’s new tablet is one of the larger models at nearly 12 inches, but Panasonic showed you can go even larger and make it work. At that point, why would you need a notebook? I left mine at home this time and used a Nook HD+ instead. Fitted with a Bluetooth keyboard and mouse, and loaded with Office-compatible programs, it did everything I needed it to do while in Vegas.

Needless to say, the Intel booth representative wasn’t too happy when I pointed this out to him. But that’s the thing about CES: There’s always some other guy at the show that has the same or better product than you. There’s always a better mousetrap or waffle-maker lurking in the South Hall. Very few companies have much of an edge in technology these days (the Chinese brands proved that in spades), and so many of these “wow, gotta have it!” items become commodities in rapid order.

The plethora of 4K and ultra-large LCD TVs found at CES proved this conclusively, as they went from hype to ho-hum in a matter of minutes. So did tablets, smart phones, and other connectivity gadgets. What CES 2013 was really about was the shift in manufacturing prowess and power to China from Japan and Korea; a shift that will only accelerate with time. And that is definitely NOT ho-hum!

Editor’s note: Many thanks and a tip of the hat to Nikon booth personnel, who were apparently charging and swapping out batteries for journalists who (like me) inadvertently ran out of power during the show. They saved me more than once!

marilyn

Marilyn says, “Gentlemen prefer 4K 3D curved wireless multi-touch OLED IGZO cloud-based voice controlled tablets!” (See you next year…)

ISE 2013 Class: Wireless AV

Is it really possible to cut the cord, and make all AV connections wireless? Not yet, but we’re closer than you might think. As the wireless AV future aproaches, keep sharpening your skills in signal distribution. In this seminar, you will examine the technical requirements and challenges of wireless audio, video and data transmission, including minimum bit rates, compression formats, spectrum requirements and new, proprietary wireless protocols such as WHDI and WiHD.

ISE 2013

Amsterdam RAI
Europaplein 2-22
1078 GZ Amsterdam
The Netherlands

InfoComm 2012: Growth and Re-Invention, by Pete Putman

As InfoComm 2012 recedes into the rear-view mirror (along with Las Vegas, thankfully), I’ve had a chance to think about some of the more significant trends I spotted at the show. Some have been picking up speed for almost a year, while the others are still moving in fits and starts.

 

Amazingly, the show has managed to glide smoothly over every potential speed bump it has hit in the past 15 years (the demise of the Projection Shoot-Out, the 2007-2009 recession, collapsing retail prices and dealer margins on hardware, consolidation of brand names, and infiltration of consumer electronics into the professional space).

Prysm's laser-phosphor displays didn't generate quite as much 'buzz' this year. Maybe the large LCDs lurking nearby had something to do with it?

 

InfoComm absorbed its nearest competitor (the National Systems Contractor Association’s trade show) a few years back. It has expanded to Asia and Europe. Its education and certification program is second to none, with over 8,000 holders of Certified Technology Specialist (CTS) certificates out there – I’m one of ‘em – and ISO certification of their education process.

 

I started attending InfoComm in 1994 as a journalist. Over the years, I’ve become more intimate with the education side of things, and now about 60% – 70% of my time at the show is taken up with teaching classes. This year alone, I had nine hours of individual instruction to offer to a total of over 750 students during a three-day period. (And I once swore I would never be a teacher. Ha!)

 

In fact, class attendance this year was the highest I’ve ever seen it, and the attendees were predominantly end-users – colleges, hospitals, institutions, corporations, non-profits, churches, and government agencies. The transition from analog to digital has swept everyone up in its wake, and InfoComm attendees don’t want to be left behind.

 

As a result, I didn’t have a lot of time to walk the trade show floor. But the significant products were out there, if you knew where to look. I even managed to feature a few of them in my classes – I’m VERY big on ‘show and tell,’ rather than ‘death by Powerpoint’ – so that attendees could get more information on the hardware and software than they’d find in the average booth tour.

Sorry - there's just no way to fit this thing into a horizontal photo, it's just too darn big!

 

The first trend is ever-larger and cheaper LCD displays. You may have heard that Sharp unveiled a 90-inch professional LCD monitor in Las Vegas (1920×1080, no price yet, but probably under $10K) and followed that up with the announcement of the TV version (LC-90LE745U, $10,999) on June 19.

 

Don’t underestimate the significance of this product. Since its introduction last fall, Sharp’s $5K 80-inch LCD TV product has proven to wildly successful, but not necessarily in the home: No, AV dealers are installing them by the truckload in commercial AV projects, with a special emphasis on financial institutions and corporations who don’t want a two-piece projector/screen ‘solution’ that requires frequent lamp changes, filter maintenance, and ambient light control.

Samsung is ready to play as well with their 75-inch edge-lit LCD monitor.

And for those of you who like watching TV underwater, Panasonic's got the solution!

 

If the 80-inch is a projector ‘threat,’ then the 90-inch is a projector ‘killer.’ Maybe not at $10K, but you know that price will come down quickly as market demand rises – and it will rise – so expect it to be selling for $7,000 – $8,000 before very long.

 

You’ll know this trend has really picked up speed when Sharp’s nearest competitors (Samsung and LG) start pushing their big LCD screens aggressively. Samsung showed a 75-inch edge-lit LCD display at the show with the ominous caption: “Time to Replace Projector in Your Conference Room.”

 

Another trend is ‘ergonomic’ control systems. At CES, there were numerous demonstrations of gesture and voice control, and Samsung has already brought a TV to market (ES7500 series) that combines both with facial recognition. I didn’t see too many demos of either in Las Vegas, but Panasonic had an interesting demo that combined body recognition with gesture control to navigate a series of maps and locate yourself on a virtual campus.

Look, Ma - both hands!

 

The challenges to design such systems are clearly outweighed by the advantages. A conference room or classroom that can recognize a user, power itself up, and load and operate any preferences in hardware and software operation is a very attractive proposition. No doubt we’ll see some more stabs at this built around the Leap platform in the near future (Leap can detect hand motion as slight as .1 millimeters).

 

Wireless connectivity goes hand-in-hand with gesture and voice commands, and I’m not talking about WiFi-based solutions – they are generally the most unreliable choice, although abundant. No, I’m referring to a slew of proprietary technologies that run on separate but parallel highways to WiFi, free of bandwidth-hogging TCP/IP traffic.

Here's a plug for getting un-plugged...from Hitachi.

 

Right now, the most promising of these is the Wireless High-Definition Interface (WHDI), which operates at 5.8 GHz, has a range of several hundred feet, and can support dozens of discrete channels that carry 1920x1080p/60 video, multichannel audio, and data. Hitachi showed a six-port (two HDMI & two VGA) wireless projector switch at InfoComm, along with a super-tiny document camera that also has WHDI built-in.

 

During my Wireless AV class, we treated attendees to the first public demonstration of WiSA – a multi-channel (7.2) wireless audio system that requires nothing more than AC power for each speaker. The room size was 50’ wide, and the technology is scalable to larger rooms. Combined with a WHDI connection to the Blu-ray player and my Toshiba computer, we were able to cut just about every cord (except for power).

 

Projector manufacturers are well aware of the challenges posed by ever-larger and cheaper LCD displays. One way to fight back is to move away from traditional short-arc mercury vapor lamps to lampless projection engines employing LEDs, lasers, or both.

At BenQ, it's all done with lasers.

And at Casio, some of it is done with lasers.

 

Casio took a substantial lead in this market a few years back with its laser/LED hybrids, and finally plugged a hole in its line with the XJ-H2650, a wide XGA (1280×800) design with 3500 ANSI lumens brightness that made its debut at InfoComm. Now, BenQ has joined the fray with a pair of laser-only single-chip DLP projectors, both rated at 2,000 lumens (LX60ST, XGA, and LW61ST, WXGA).

 

But the bigger news came from Panasonic, who not only embraced hybrid technology but jumped all the way to 1920×1080 resolution while doing it. They’re rolling out two different versions – one for education, and one for commercial applications – and the PT-RZ470 is claimed to develop in excess of 3,000 lumens. There is a wide XGA version as well, known as the PT-RW430, and it’s also rated over 3,000 lumens. Both BenQ and Panasonic claim you’ll see about 20,000 hours of operation from the laser/LED light engine before it poops out.

 

Other companies showed ‘lampless’ projection technology at the show, including Optoma. But most of these demos were small, pocket-sized projectors that are good for a few hundred lumens at most. Digital Projection and projectiondesign also showcased LED-only offerings that can hit the 1,000 lumens barrier, but we still haven’t seen a ‘pure’ LED design that can beat the 2,000 lumens benchmark…for now.

 

Haptic control technology – i.e. touchscreen LCDs – was in abundance at the show. Samsung showed a demonstration of a large LCD touchscreen table that can be used to display images of retail merchandise. These images can then be ‘dragged’ onto a Windows 8-equipped smart phone and create a shopping cart, or even a checklist. Whatever is dragged into the smart phone is automatically mirrored to a nearby sales associate tablet, supposedly simplifying the shopping process for both parties.

 

There's probably a cool table hockey demo lurking somewhere in here...

136 60-inch monitors in five walls. You can count 'em.

And here's the videowall in action during the musical.

 

One of the more impressive demonstrations took place at Planet Hollywood, where a new musical was finishing up rehearsals. Based on songs by the Beach Boys (who are celebrating their 50th year with a nationwide tour) , ‘Surf: The Musical’ uses five walls of 60-inch Sharp LCD monitors for all of its scenic backdrops. The walls were designed and built by Adaptive Technologies and can slide in and out and raise/lower during the performance as needed to accommodate some real 3D constructed sets.

 

Each wall weighs about 8,000 pounds and it took some experimentation to figure out an adequate damping system to raise and lower the walls without any bouncing. Dynamic video processing keeps the displayed images static as the walls move up and down, creating the illusion of a curtain. If you get a chance to see the show, you will be impressed with the Ferris Wheel sequence – it felt real to me.

 

I can’t wrap up this piece without mentioning the absence of one of InfoComm’s largest members and long-time exhibitors, Extron Electronics. You’ve probably heard numerous reasons why they opted to skip the show (none of which made any sense to me, particularly since Extron did participate at NAB in April). Extron is a nearly 30-year-old bellweather interfacing company and without them, the Projection Shoot-Out wouldn’t have been possible.  (Neither would the annual Extron Bash party, now R.I.P.)

Kramer erected a new booth to showcase their CORE digital products.

 

Suffice it to say that there was plenty of chatter and speculation in my classes about Extron’s absence, along with more than a few delighted competitors who ‘stayed the course’ and reported strong booth attendance on the show floor. The enormous turnout for any classes that had the words “EDID,” “HDCP,” “HDMI,” or “digital video” in their titles and/or descriptions apparently also meant a tide of visitors to booths showing those products, such as Kramer Electronics.

 

So, there you have it – a quick fly-by of InfoComm. Next year, I’m going to try more ambitious wireless demos (including some products I just found out about at the show) and will expand my digital video curriculum with Web-connected TVs, if everything works out. Try and make it, we’ll be in Orlando a year from now. Should be fun!

 

See you there?