Posts Tagged ‘HDTV’

How to Watch FOX 5 and My 9 Without Cable (updated)

Attention, Cablevision (and Time-Warner, and Comcast customers): The dispute with FOX 5 may be over, but it could happen again with another cable TV system – or another TV network. Here’s how to future-proof your TV reception against another retransmission rights dispute.

There are other ways to receive WNYW (FOX 5) and WWOR (My 9). Read on. One of them may work for you, and if so, you can continue to enjoy football and baseball while Fox and Cablevision “punt” this rights dispute back and forth to each other.

Here’s what you need to know: WNYW broadcasts a digital TV signal on physical UHF TV channel 44, even though the station identifies itself as “5-1.” And WWOR (My 9) broadcasts its DTV signal on physical UHF channel 38, even though it identifies as “9-1.”

So that means at the least that you need a UHF TV antenna. They’re not very large and they’re not expensive, either.

IF YOU OWN A NEW FLATSCREEN TV (VINTAGE 2007 – PRESENT)

All TVs manufactured after March 1, 2007 must include a digital TV tuner by law. So your new TV is already equipped to pick up WNYW. If you live within 10 miles of the Empire State Building, all you will need is a simple UHF antenna.

Radio Shack’s model T#749, catalog # 15-1874, is an excellent choice to start. It does not require any power, and if it doesn’t work, you can return it for a full refund within 30 days.  The cost is $12. Radio Shack’s Web site says this model is available in most stores.

(1) Connect this antenna to the “ANT IN” or “RF” threaded jack on the back of your TV. The loop portion is what is used to pick up WNYW, along with other UHF DTV channels like WCBS, WNBC, and WWOR (My 9). (If you want to pick up other VHF channels like WABC-7, WPIX-11, and WNET-13, extend the rabbit ears all the way, too.)

(2) Switch to the TV input. Next, consult your TV’s owner manual to find the menu selection for “Channel Scan” or “Scan for Channels.” Enter this menu, and make sure that “Air,” “Broadcast,” or “OTA” is selected and not “Cable” when you start a channel scan.

(3) Your TV will take about 2 – 3 minutes to scan for any over-the-air digital TV channels it can find. You should see a list of those channels as the scan progresses. If you see “WNYW 5-1” pop up, you are in luck! If not, reposition the antenna and try another scan. HINT: Elevate the antenna and place it near any open windows if you do not pick up the signal.

(4) WNYW also carries the WWOR My 9 programs as channel 5-2. And WWOR simulcasts WNYW FOX 5 programs on 9-2. So if channel 5 doesn’t come in after several tries, you may still be able to watch FOX programming on channel 9-2. Check that either or both channels were scanned and saved to memory.

IF YOU DON’T HAVE A NEW TV

Radio Shack continues to sell DTV converter boxes, even though the analog TV shut-down happened a year ago. Check your store for model DTX9950, catalog #: 15-150 (Digital Stream). It sells for $60. This converter box can be easily connected to your older TV set, using the RF or AV cables supplied with the converter.

(1) After connecting to your older TV, follow the converter boxes’ instructions on how to connect an antenna and scan for channels. The Radio Shack 15-1874 antenna works very well with this converter box, too.

(2) Again, look to see that WNYW 5-1, WWOR 9-1, or both channels have been scanned and saved to memory. You will be all set to watch the Jets game, NFC football, and the World Series. It will NOT be in high-definition, though.

IF YOU LIVE 10 – 15 MILES FROM EMPIRE

You may need an amplified antenna. The Radio Shack model 15-254, catalog 15-254 may do the trick. It costs about $35 and you can rotate the loop antenna for best reception. Radio Shack’s Web site says this model is available in most stores.

IF YOU LIVE 15 MILES OR MORE FROM EMPIRE

If you are more than 15 miles from the Empire State Building, a rooftop or attic antenna for UHF may be required. These are available at Home Depot, Lowe’s, and Radio Shack.

The Radio Shack model U-75R, catalog 15-2160 is an excellent choice. It costs $40 and is small enough to place in an attic, by a window, on a deck, etc. Just unfold the antenna elements, hook up the coaxial cable to your digital TV or converter box, and aim it in the direction of the Empire State Building. Scan for channels on your digital TV or converter box as before.

Good luck! Also reference these articles about indoor and outdoor DTV reception:

http://www.hdtvexpert.com/?p=449

http://www.hdtvexpert.com/?p=36

The 3D Fire Sales have Begun

PriceSCAN has just released its latest 3D Blu-ray Player Index, and it’s a doozy.

The 3D BD Player Index is a composite of all models currently at retail, and the average price for those models has dropped by 26% in six months, with a 10.6% drop in just the past week.

PriceSCAN listed Sony’s BDP-S570 as a good example of aggressive discounting. This player, which required a firmware upgrade to support 3D playback, has fallen from a retail price of $250 to $170 since late February.

From my own experience, I was able to score Samsung’s BD-C6900 3D BD player for just $244 plus shipping from Amazon in early September. Its original list price was closer to $400 when unveiled shortly after CES.

These rapid drops in retail prices reflect the low level of enthusiasm for 3D TV that has been evidenced to date. In an earlier post, I referenced an NPD Group study that showed only 11% of respondents in a recent poll had any plans to buy a 3D TV in the near future, citing concerns about technology, cost issues, the lack of content, and the need to wear expensive, proprietary glasses.

Can prices on BD players and TVs drop low enough to overcome the other objections? Probably not, as the lack of content is still a big problem. There needs to be bucketloads of 3D content available to drive sales, and right now, we’re talking about glassfuls.

If you are thinking about taking the dive into 3D, you’d be best off sitting on your hands for a few more weeks. I have a feeling we’re going to see even deeper discounts on BD players and TVs, probably on the order of 30 – 40% by the time January rolls around.

Think I’m nuts? I just Googled retail prices for the BD-C6900, and it’s now down to $214 (plus shipping) at Amazon, Tiger Direct, PC Richard, Vann’s, and ABT.  (Buyer’s remorse alert – I bought one too soon!!)

Cord-cutting: Funny Thing About That… (Updated 10/28/10)

(Editor’s note: This story has been updated from the 10/27/10 post.)

Yesterday, Comcast Corporation announced its 3rd quarter financial results, and they reveal a disturbing trend: 275,000 basic cable subscribers said goodbye to Big C, helping to put a pinch on the company’s net income, which dropped 8.2% to $867M on sales of $9.4B.

According to a story on the Fierce Cable Web site, remaining Comcast subscribers paid an average of $129.75 per month for various services.

The story suggests four factors that are driving people to drop cable TV subscriptions – the economy, the flagging housing market, constant rate increases, and the digital TV transition.  Comcast Cable Communications President Neil Smit was quoted in the story as saying there are no signs that the customers are giving up cable for over-the-top (Internet TV) services. “All our active surveys have seen almost no impact from OTT… (a) small number of customers appear to be going over-the-air (DTTB) more than any over-the-top impact.”

Through September of this year, Comcast lost 622,000 cable TV subscribers, according to a story in the 10/28/10 edition of the Philadelphia Inquirer. That represents about 3 percent of its subscriber base and about $300M in revenue. Smits said that 40% of those cancellations were basic cable tier subscribers.

By this time last year, Comcast had lost 424,000 cable TV subscribers. The drop rate has gone up by nearly 50% in just one year, although some of that was offset by new subscriptions for almost 250,000 broadband customers, 228,000 VoIP customers, and 219,000 digital video customers. (It’s reasonable to assume there is lots of overlap in those last three numbers, as the three services are often taken as a ‘triple play’ bundle.)

The term “cord-cutting” first appeared in early 2008 as the current recession took hold, forcing many households to re-assess the amount of money they spent each month on communications and entertainment services.  It’s not unusual for a typical ‘triple play’ service (VoIP, broadband and cable TV) to cost $130 a month or more.

Add in monthly charges for a standard family wireless phone plan, and we’re starting to talk some real money here!  So it’s no wonder that consumers are looking for more economical ways to watch TV – and free, over-the-air digital TV (with lots of HD) is definitely one of them.

DTTB also solves the current Fox – Cablevision dispute quite nicely for several million subscribers in the New York City metropolitan area – that is, if they figure out how to connect an antenna to their digital TV. In many cases, that means nothing more than a $12 radio Shack UHF loop and rabbit ears.

Comcast COO Steve Burke called attention to the problem of cord-cutting a year ago at the CTAM convention in Denver, CO, pointing out that “…An entire generation is growing up, if we don’t figure out how to change that behavior so it respects copyright and subscription revenue on the part of distributors, we’re going to wake up and see cord cutting.”

How prescient. As I’ve written in the past, families are starting to value their broadband service more than tiers of dozens of cable channels, most of which are never viewed anyway. Add in video streaming from Netflix (something Redbox is also about to offer) for a flat monthly rate, plus selected network offerings on Hulu, and the cable industry has a legitimate concern.

No one should ever think they can’t price themselves out of a market. It’s happened before, and it will happen again. It’s very clear from recent trends that many consumers are placing a greater value on high-speed Internet access over cable TV channel packages, a trend that may result in Comcast (and other service providers) delivering metered broadband service in the not-too-distant future – especially if TV subscriptions continue to decline.

The challenge for Comcast and other cable MSOs is how to re-structure their standard TV channel offerings into a more affordable a la carte model, served up on demand.

That’s obviously what consumers want, and they’re voting with their wallets. Is Big Cable listening?

3D: Amazed, but Not Interested

A recent study by the NPD Group (3D 3600 Monitor) states that “…20 percent of consumers reported being “amazed” by the 3D demos in stores, versus only 15 percent who felt that way about their experience in the (3D movie) theater.”

Wow. Only twenty percent were ‘amazed?’? That’s not very impressive for a new technology that has been marketed like crazy for the past ten months, and on which most manufacturers are hanging their hopes for a robust holiday TV selling season.

The report goes on to state that “…42 percent of consumers surveyed were at least somewhat interested in watching 3D movies at home, but only 11 percent intend to purchase a 3D television.” More discouraging news, as you’d reasonably expect interest in 3D TV to be peaking now after ESPN’s 3D World Cup coverage and a slew of 3D theatrical releases that earned big bucks at the box office.

Oh, wait: I forgot – Blu-ray releases of most of 2010’s box office 3D movie hits are already tied up in exclusive TV manufacturer bundles for the foreseeable future. It’s that ‘availability of 3D content’ thing again – there’s just not enough of it out there for most consumers to justify the purchase of a new 3D TV right now.

Well, THAT gets old in a hurry!

NPD’s report also showed that consumers have objections about cost, the need to wear glasses, the relatively short time that 3D technology has been available, and whether or not all technical issues with 3D TV viewing have been addressed (whatever they are).

Of those intending to buy a 3D TV, “…more than half say that 3D enhances the viewing experience, and 42 percent agree with the statement that 3D is the future.” So, about 6% of all 1,100 respondents said that 3D enhances the viewing experience. That’s a VERY low number. (What puzzles me is that only about half of the people intending to buy a 3D TV agreed with that statement. Why buy a 3D TV in the first place, if you don’t think it is an enhancement?)

It’s becoming apparent to me that two things are really holding back 3D TV. The first is cost. There are simply too many great deals on conventional (2D) HDTVs out there, and plain vanilla HDTV (never thought I’d say that) programming is available in abundance. For folks that are upgrading older TVs, the jump to HD is big enough for now. 3D can wait. Prices need to drop and drop fast on 3D-ready sets, which can just replace existing 2D-only models.

The second problem is all of the exclusive Blu-ray bundle deals. Between the TV manufacturers who cooked up these schemes and studios who agreed to go along, they’ve managed to shoot themselves in both feet quite nicely. Marketing 101 teaches you that you don’t make a product hard to find or expensive if you expect to sell a lot of it. (Unless it’s an upscale brand with a solid reputation, like Ferrari or Tiffany.)

We’re closing in on Black Friday and a major selling season for TVs, and right now, it looks like most consumers will be ‘sitting it out’ this year with 3D.  (Hey, TV sales are tough all over. 6th Avenue Electronics can’t even get rid of Panasonic 2D 50-inch 720p plasma TVs for $397, and that deal has been running for almost a month!)

Shades of Crazy Eddie…

Tomorrow (Saturday, October 2), 6th Avenue Electronics will celebrate the opening of their new store in Deptford, NJ with a chain-wide blow-out sale on TVs.

And when I say blow-out, I mean BLOW-OUT!

Can’t beat that deal with a stick!

Here’s what caught my eye this morning: 350 Panasonic TCP42C2 42-inch 720p plasma TVs will be sold for $397.95, a discount of $200 from full retail. And if you want something bigger, 250 Panasonic TCP50C2 50-inch 720p plasma TVs will be tagged at $548.95 each – almost $250 off their normal retail price.

There are other goodies to be had. Want an LG 50PK250 1080p 50-inch plasma TV? Get there early enough, and it’s yours for $788. How does an LG 60PK250 60-inch 1080p plasma TV sound for $1188? Or a Panasonic TCP58S2 58-inch 1080p plasma for $1198?

If LCD’s your thing, you can scoop up a Samsung 46-inch 1080p LCD TV for $648, or a Toshiba 46G300 1080p LCD TV for $749. 6th Avenue’s also got a Toshiba upconverting DVD player for $29.95 and a Panasonic Blu-ray player for $100.  The flier in today’s Philadelphia Inquirer goes on to list all kinds of electronic goodies for rock-bottom prices, including a $80 netbook with 7″ LCD screen, an Olympus 10 megapixel digital camera for $65, and a JVC 8 MP pocket movie camera for $70.

Face it. All electronics are commodity products nowadays. No wonder so many TV manufacturers are struggling to make a buck!

Can’t wait to see how low prices go on Black Friday…