Posts Tagged ‘DirecTV’

Samsung, Panasonic Get a Flying Start on 3D

This past Tuesday and Wednesday, Samsung and Panasonic showed they’re serious about marketing and selling 3D TVs in the United States with some significant product announcements.

Samsung’s press event, held at the Samsung Experience in the Time Warner Center, showcased numerous demos of 3D plasma and LCD TVs.  Content from 3D Blu-ray discs and DirecTV was featured, and DreamWorks Animation head Jeffrey Katzenberg even stopped by to add his two cents to the proceedings, attracting a crowd of paparazzi along the way.

In the LCD line, the LN46C750 (CCFL) will be first out of the gate with 3D support and 240Hz image processing. It is expected to retail for $1q,700 and will be in stores in May. Over in the LED BL LCD line, eight models ranging in size from 40 to 55 inches will handle 3D playback, starting with the $1,999 UN40C7000 and topping out with the 55-inch UN55C9000.  Look for shipments to start in March with selected models.

Here’s the UN46C9000 in action, showing 3D content from DirecTV.

Plasma is still part of the 3D equation at Samsung, and six new PDP TVs are ready to deliver 3D. The 63-inch PN63C8000 sits at the top of the line and will set you back $3,800 (May 2010), while the 50-inch PN-50C7000 can be yours fro just $1,800 (also May 2010).

Got Blu-ray? The BD-C6900 is BD3D compatible and ready to deliver the goods (which is a neat trick, considering that Silicon Image just finalized the HDMI 1.4 delivery formats last week!) for $399. It should show up later this month. Each 3DTV and the Blu-ray player will  come with one pair of active shutter glasses. (Samsung is also running a limited-time promotion with two pairs of glasses and a 3D BD copy of Monsters Vs. Aliens with each new TV.)

On Wednesday, Panasonic unveiled its first 3D TV entry, the 50-inch TC-V50PT20 ($2,499). This set will come with one pair of active shutter glasses.  Larger models will be rolled out as the year progresses, and there aren’t any plans currently for 42-inch or 46-inch 3D models. (No surprise, considering how inexpensive 50-inch glass has become!)

There’s also a new Blu-ray player, the BDT-300. It will retail for $399 at Best Buy. Want the TV, player, and glasses? You can have the lot for $2,900.

It should be noted that plasma TVs have always had the ability to switch at the high speeds required for 3D (120 Hz)..they just haven’t had the correct interface and HDMI 1.4 support. LCD TVs that process at 240Hz can also juggle a 3D signal nicely. (For that matter, so can 120 Hz sets, but the faster refresh rate does a cleaner job with motion detail.)

It’s possible that many of these sets will be purchased and not used for 3D viewing right away, as consumers want to “future-proof” themselves. Considering how few Blu-ray players are on the market, it’s probably not a bad idea to wait a few months until more product is on the shelves and the market figures out pricing.

Here’s an actual side-by-side 1080i video frame from DirecTV.

As for DBS and cable-delivered 3D, you’ll need an upgraded set-top box with HDMI 1.4 support to view the side-by-side 3D content that most networks are likely to use. DirecTV has already stated its intention to use side-by-side, while ESPN is still in the planning stages.

Keep in mind that both side-by-side and top/bottom 3D delivery formats cut resolution in half. Side by side slices horizontal resolution, while top/bottom pares vertical resolution. For a 1080i image, that means 960×1080 pixels in each eye, while the 720p format gets whacked down to 640×720 pixels per eye…not much better than a DVD.

In contrast, the Blu-ray format delivers two complete 1920×1080 progressive frames (left eye on top, and right eye below) with a blanking interval of about 40 – 45 pixels. So you can expect 3D content from Blu-ray to look much better than network content.