Posts Tagged ‘ATSC 3.0’

NAB 2019: Where Does It Go From Here?

This year’s NAB Show marked a milestone for me as it was my 25th consecutive April visit to the halls of the Las Vegas Convention Center. Back in 1995, my first impression was of enormous booths full of expensive hardware (lots of cameras with five-figure price tags), tape-based recording and editing systems, huge audio consoles, and the costly first iterations of non-linear video editing systems.

The World Wide Web was just becoming a thing, and NAB had set up an area in the then-Hilton ballroom so that a bunch of small companies (none of whose names I remember and none of who are around any more) could amaze us with stories of video streaming (basically tiny stamp-sized clips of low-resolution talking heads) and how someday, “all of this will be available to anyone with an Internet connection.” Of course, it would have to be a lot faster than the dial-up speeds available then.

I just remember shaking my head, thinking none of this would ever fly, and moving onto the big, expensive hardware. SDI, VGA, BNC connectors – stuff I could understand. “Reference” video monitors were bulky, heavy chassis with cathode-ray tubes and sold for tens of thousands of dollars.

Video itself was largely standard definition back then – HDTV was still in its infancy, and the so-called “Grand Alliance” of companies like Zenith/LG, AT&T, General Instrument, and others were pushing for an all-digital broadcast television system to replace NTSC. (Grand Alliance banners were prominently featured on the outside facades of the North Hall and Central Hall.)

Sharp’s 8C-30A is the first 8K DSLR to market. It only shoots 30p, but that’s a bus speed and interfacing limitation.

 

NHK’s been broadcasting 8K video content via satellite since last December and will cover the 2020 Olympics extensively in 8K.

And the “broadcast” part of NAB was BIG. Lots of companies showing exciters, transmitters, antennas, monitoring equipment, tubes and solid-state rigs, and hardline and waveguide dominated the North Hall and part of the Central Hall. Industry giants like Panasonic, JVC, Hitachi, Sony, Ikegami, Canon, and Toshiba constructed booths larger than the average house. Life was good, sales were brisk, and there was plenty of profit for everyone.

At the time, I was writing columns and feature articles for Video Systems, and our annual NAB issue was so stuffed with ads that it ran well over 300 pages. Other publications were jockeying for ad sales and editorial coverage, filling NAB press conferences to the rafters. You may remember some of them – Videography, Post, Millimeter, AV Video, Broadcast Engineering, TV Technology, and Television Broadcast, to name a few.

We all know what happened in the intervening years. The “broadcast” part of NAB is a tiny portion of the exhibit floor now. Those streaming video guys with their advanced codecs now rule the roost. High-quality video cameras capable of shooting 4K video sell for one-tenth of those 1995 models and do it all to solid-state memory cards. Non-linear editing is so ubiquitous that you can buy the software for about $100 and run it on your everyday laptop. And trade publications are largely dinosaurs.

We made the transition to digital TV broadcasting in 2009 and are about to move again to a newer, more IP-centric system, ATSC 3.0. CRTs are a distant memory, replaced by large high-resolution flat screen LCD and OLED displays. High dynamic range with its associated wider color gamut is muscling its way into our homes and theaters. High frame rate video, once considered a major obstacle, is becoming reality, even at Ultra HD resolution.

Chris Chinnock of the 8K Association ran a full day of 8K seminars on Wednesday.

 

Socionext is the only chip manufacturer able to deliver HDMI 2.1 TX and RX chipsets at present.

And those once-enormous booths are steadily shrinking each year as profit continues to evaporate from hardware sales. Indeed; the focus at this year’s NAB Show seemed to be shifting (as one company VP put it) away from capital expenditures (CapEx) to operating expenditures (OpEx). Hardware is increasingly becoming generic – the ATSC 3.0 single-frequency network broadcasting demos in the North Hall ran off a pair of compact Dell servers – and software is the new king of the hill. (How much booth space do you really need to demo software?)

The shift away from hardware to software may also be impacting attendance. The official head count for 2017 was 103,443. Two years later, attendance was pegged at 91,460; representing a decline of 11.6%, or 12,000 visitors. That’s quite a dip – not as pronounced as the drop from 2008 to 2009 during the Great Recession, but still enough to give show organizers some reason for concern.

The general feeling among many of my colleagues and friends was that the show was trying to find an identify. The theme of the show was “Every Story Starts Here,” which is about as generic and vague as you can get. Was that a reference to the fact that that high-quality tools to capture, edit, and produce compelling video are a relative bargain these days, and that we should concentrate more on how we use them and less on how they work?

Astro exhibited many things 8K, including this compact 8K/120 camera with built-in CCU.

 

Leyard Planar brought back their 8K LED fine pitch videowall from a year ago.

I don’t have the answers. What I can tell you is that there were still some interesting products to be found in Las Vegas, and from my perspective, a great deal of them pertained to UHD video capture, editing, and distribution. My focus has always been forward-looking (aside from the nostalgia piece I opened this feature with), so the transition of HDTV to Ultra HDTV and the attendant transitions to a new digital TV broadcast system and advanced video codecs held the greatest interest for me.

Yes, 8K has arrived, Yes, it’s not immediately obvious why we need it. But like it or not, the cameras are here, the displays are coming to store shelves, and at least one broadcaster (NHK) is operating a 24/7 8K video channel. Companies that showed 8K cameras at NAB included Sony, Ikegami, RED, Hitachi, and Sharp. The latter brand made 8K the focus of their entire booth, a bold and impressive statement considering Sharp was nearing bankruptcy not that long ago.

Panasonic’s take on 8K was something called an “area of interest” camera, allowing anyone to dynamically select and switch between any of four 2K video slices of the overall image. This technique was described by NHK a few years back at the annual SMPTE Conference as a way to achieve a multi-camera shoot with just one or two cameras. Astro (who has commercialized many of NHK’s 8K innovations) had several flavors of 8K on display including a stereo VR camera, a fisheye lens fitted to an 8K camera, and a compact 8K/120p camera with CCU built-in that weighed less than 10 pounds.

Panasonic’s 8K Area Of Interest (AOI) camera lets you create a virtual four-camera 2K shoot and switcher – all from one static view.

 

Sony’s UHC-8300 8K portable camcorder will get a workout at the 2020 Olympics.

Astro also addressed an on-going challenge for adoption of 8K video and display, and that was upconverting 1080p/2K content in an acceptable manner. Their demo of an AI-based up-scaling system was quite impressive, particularly given the challenging test patterns and fine text used in the demo. Sharp’s big announcement was the availability of the world’s first DLSR with 8K native resolution. The 8C-30A can shoot 8K/30p video using a Micro Four Thirds sensor and a variety of lenses, but will be pricey at around $4,000.

Notable by their absence in this market: Canon. I was told by a company official that Canon does sell an 8K camera in Japan for broadcast and production, but has no plans to offer it stateside unless there is sufficient demand. Of course, Japan remains the focus for every player in 8K, what with the summer Olympics coming up in 2020 and brands like Hitachi and Sony jockeying to provide cameras and hardware to cover the event.

Given the enormous volume of data that 4K and 8K cameras generate, I was also on the lookout for advanced codecs. HEVC H.265 has been around for a few years and could be suitable for the job. The only question is latency, particularly for contribution. NTT seems to have a handle on the problem, as they showed a prototype encoder/decoder combination for 4K/120 video that has an end-to-end latency of just 37 milliseconds.

If you’re having trouble keeping track of all the players in UHD HDR, this chart may help. Or not.

 

Ikegami also has an 8K production camera ready for the 2020 Olympics.

Another approach is to improve codec efficiency. At the Wednesday 8K Association seminars, a more detailed explanation of the new Versatile Video Codec (VVC, perhaps to become H.266?) was offered. The key to improving efficiency is increasing the maximum encoding block size from 64×64 used in H.265 to 128×128, with a targeted reduction of 50% in bit rate. Presently, the actual improvement is about 34% as software evolves.

Astro and Sharp also demonstrated a practical 8K/60p non-linear editing and color correction platform known as Tamazone. It imports 8K 4:2:2 10-bit YUV from Sharp’s 8C-60A camcorder using four 12G SDI connections through BlackMagic Design’s DeckLink 8K Pro interface, with DaVinci Resolve 15 Studio and Resolve Live software. To view what you’re working on, an nVIDIA Quadro Pro 4000 graphics card drives a pair of DisplayPort 1.2 interfaces on an associated 8K monitor, stitching together two 4K images.

Yes, it’s a bit of a “Scotch Tape and paper clips” solution at the display end…but then, so was 4K when it first got off the ground more than a decade ago. The real challenge now is at the monitor – there really aren’t any true 8K reference monitors out there. Sharp showed a 32-inch prototype using their IGZO TFT backplane technology, but for now, the few 8K monitor products being talked about are largely based on consumer television designs. (LG Display has also shown an 8K 31.5” monitor for several years now.)

Advantech was streaming 8K/60 video across their booth over a fast IP network at 200 Mb/s using HEVC H.265.

 

NTT claims they can encode and decode 4K / UHD video with a 120 Hz frame rate using H.265, but with just 37 milliseconds of latency end-to-end.

It’s possible that the new 31.5” 4K LCD monitors shown by Panasonic, Sony, and others might fit the bill eventually. This HDR monitor uses two panels. The first is a 4096×2160 IPS-Alpha LCD with full array backlight, while the second panel is identical in construction but free of color filters. It is precisely aligned with the first panel and works as a monochromatic light shutter to provide really deep black levels. Of course, it requires a lot more horsepower in the backlight as a consequence.

Another popular discussion on the show floor was the concept of shooting, editing, and archiving at higher resolution and using lower-resolution (4K, Full HD) for distribution. In this way, the goals of improving current HD and 4K video quality can be improved significantly, but the finished product is a bit more friendly to bandwidth-constricted distribution systems like broadcast and streaming. Hitachi has argued for Full HD with HDR as a practical broadcast format (it is) and a 4K program derived from an 8K master would look pretty darn good on Netflix and Amazon Prime.

So many questions and not a lot of answers, just possible solutions. I expect NAB to get smaller over time as the emphasis shifts from hardware to software (ironic, given the LVCC is in the middle of another expansion to almost 4 million square feet). No doubt 8K will be a part of it, as will IP-based distribution of media. No wonder there was an air of “where do we go from here?” during the show…

NAB 2016: Thoughts and Afterthoughts

I’m back from my 22nd consecutive NAB Show, and it’s always a worthwhile trip. NAB isn’t quite as large or crazy as CES, but it’s still sprawled out enough to require three full days to see everything. (Except that you don’t have to fight the insane crowds that fill the Las Vegas Convention Center in January.)

This year’s theme was “Unleash!” or something like that. I never was completely sure, and it sounded more appropriate for a competition of hunting dogs anyway. But the crowds came anyway (over 100,000 for sure) to see everything from 4K and 8K video to live demonstrations of the new ATSC 3.0 digital broadcasting system, a plethora of small 4K cameras, the accelerating move to IP infrastructures instead of SDI, and video streaming to every conceivable device.

My visit to the show had a threefold purpose. In addition to press coverage and checking out product trends for customers, I also delivered a presentation during the Broadcast Engineering Conference titled “Next Generation Interfaces: Progress, or Babylon?” The subject was a new wave of high-speed interfaces needed to connect 4K, 5K, 6K, and 8K displays (DisplayPort, HDMI 2.0, and superMHL, not to mention Display Stream Compression).

Besides hundreds of exhibits, there are the pavilions. Trade shows LOVE setting up pavilions to showcase a hot technology or trend. Sometimes they’re a bit premature: In 1999, the show featured an enormous “streaming media” area in the central hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center stuffed full of startup companies showing postage-stamp-sized video, streaming over DSL and dial-up connections. All of those companies were gone a year later.

In addition to the Futures Park pavilion – which showcased NHK’s 8K broadcasting efforts and ATSC 3.0, and which was mysteriously stuffed all the way at the back (east) end of the upper south hall, where few people rarely go – there was the Sprockit startup pavilion in the north hall, near the Virtual Reality / Augmented Reality pavilion (more on that in a moment).

This setup was useed to capture HDR and SDR images of the model, stream them to the roof, and link via 18 GHz microwave to Black Mountain...

This setup was used to capture HDR and SDR images of the model, stream them to the roof, and link via 18 GHz microwave to Black Mountain…

 

...where the images where coded as HEVC H.265 4K signals and broadcast on UHF channel 50, back to the convention center. (Introducing about 14 seconds of latency along the way...)

…where the images were coded as HEVC H.265 4K signals and broadcast on UHF channel 50, back to the convention center. (Introducing about 14 seconds of latency along the way…)

There was also a demonstration of ATSC 3.0 in the home, located at the upper entrance (west end) of the south hall. Outside, Nokia set up a concert stage and had entertainment each day, all day long, streaming the performances into the VR/AR booth for viewing and listening on appropriate headgear.

To set the table and see just how much the industry has changed in a little over 20 years, the “hot” broadcasting formats in 1995 were Digital Betacam (two years old), DVCPRO, and a new HD format called D5. Non-linear editing was just getting off the ground from the likes of Avid, Media 100, and Boxx Technologies. A decent SD camera for studio and field production cost about $20,000, and HD was still very much in the experimental stage – the new Grand Alliance HD format was heavily promoting the format, model station WHD in Washington was conducting trial broadcasts, and there was no such thing as 720p/60/59.94 just yet.

The standard connectors for video? BNC and RCA for composite, with BNC doubling for the serial digital interface (SDI) connection. VGA was the connector of choice for PCs, and component video was tricky to implement. Tape was the preferred recording media, as optical disc hadn’t made its public debut yet. “High resolution” on a graphics workstation was around 1280×1024 (SXGA), a “bright” LCD projector could crank out about 500 lumens with 640×480 resolution, and the Internet was still a mystery to 90% of attendees.

We all know how the intervening years played out. TV broadcasters are now in the middle of a channel auction, and we may lose more UHF spectrum (in 1995, UHF channels ran from 14 to 69), possibly as much as 60 – 80+ MHz, or 10 – 14 channels. Demand for optical disc media is very much on the wane as streaming and cloud services are picking up the reins.

You don’t see very many transmitter and antenna manufacturers at the show any more, and when you do, their booths are pretty small. There’s been consolidation in the industry with antenna maker Dielectric shutting down a few years ago, then getting bought by the Sinclair Broadcast Group and revived (just in time for the auction!). Harmonic recently purchased Thomson, which explains the big empty booth where they should have been.

Z3's DME-10 is a super-tiny H.264 encoder for IP streaming.

Z3’s DME-10 is a super-tiny H.264 encoder for IP streaming.

 

Vitec's H.264 encoders aren't much bigger!

Vitec’s H.264 encoders aren’t much bigger!

And the biggest booth at the show doesn’t belong to Sony, or Panasonic, or Imagine (Harris). Nope, that honor goes to Canon, showing you that there’s still plenty of money to be made in video and still cameras, optical glass, and camera sensors. In a sign o’ the times, Panasonic’s once-enormous booth, which occupied the full width of the central hall mezzanine, has shrunk down to about half its original size.

NAB now is all about “anytime, anywhere” content creation, mastering, storage, and delivery. The concept of broadcasting is almost quaint these days (ATSC 3.0 notwithstanding) as more and more viewers avail themselves of faster broadband speeds and opt for on-demand streaming and binge viewing of TV shows.

Brands like Netflix and Amazon are stirring the pot, not ABC and NBC. (Most of the TV shows in the top 20 every week are CBS programs.) YouTube now offers a premium ad-free service (ironic, since ten years ago it was a place to share videos commercial-free). And this year’s “3D” is virtual reality (VR), backed up by augmented reality (AR).

Nokia's VR camera has 8 super-wide-angle lenses and 8 microphones. And I'm sorry, it DOES look like a high-tech hair dryer...

Nokia’s VR camera has 8 super-wide-angle lenses and 8 microphones. And I’m sorry, it DOES look like a high-tech hair dryer…

 

That is a lot of stuff to put on your head just so you can escape reality, isn't it?

That is a lot of stuff to put on your head just so you can escape reality, isn’t it?

Not clear on the difference? VR presents a totally electronic “pseudo” view of the world, which can be represented by custom video clips or generated by computer graphics. AR takes real-world views and overlays text, graphics, and other picture elements to “augment” your experience.

Google Glass is a good example of augmented reality – you’d walk down the street and graphics would appear in the near-to-eye display, showing you the location of a restaurant, displaying a text message, or alerting you to a phone call. Oculus Rift and Samsung Galaxy Gear are good examples of virtual reality, immersing your eyes and ears in imaginary worlds with large headsets and earphones.

I’ve tried VR and AR systems a few times, and the eyewear works- but it’s heavy and quite bulky. And the multichannel spatial audio is also impressive, but I have to strap headphones over those enormous headsets. In fact, the biggest problem with VR and AR right now IS the headset.  Galaxy Gear and other systems use your smartphone as a stereo display (you can do the same thing with a simple cardboard viewer), but the resolution of your smartphone’s display simply isn’t fine enough to work in a near-to-eye application.

After you wear a VR/AR headset for a while and stand up and take it off, you may find your sense of balance is also out of whack and that you momentarily have some trouble walking correctly. That’s another example of a spatial disorientation problem caused by the disconnect between your eyesight and other senses.

If some of these problems sound familiar, they should. We heard much the same thing during the latest incarnation of 3D from 2008 to 2012, particularly from people wearing active-shutter 3D glasses. During the roll-out of 3D, it became apparent that as much as 25% of the general population could not view 3D correctly because of eye disorders, spatial disorientation, incompatibility with contact lenses, and other problems.

Boland's selling the 55-inch LG Display RGBW 4K OLED as a broadcast monitor.

Boland’s selling the 55-inch LG Display RGBW 4K OLED as a broadcast monitor.

 

Fusion is selling the same monitor as a

Fusion is selling the same monitor as a “reference” broadcast monitor and multiviewer. (Sony’s got it, too!)

Back to reality! Here are a few more interesting things I saw in Las Vegas:

ATSC 3.0 is ready for its day in the sun. A consortium of interest groups recently petitioned the FCC to make that happen, and based on the demos at the show, it has a fighting chance to ensure broadcasting sticks around for a while. For current TVs, some sort of sidecar box will be required. But you’ll be able to watch 4K (Ultra HD) broadcasts with spatial audio and stream broadcast content to phones, tablets, and laptops, too.

8K Real-Time HEVC Encoding was on display in the NTT and NEC booths. For those counting, there are 7680 horizontal and 4320 vertical pixels in one 8K image, and both companies had demos of 4:2:0 video streaming at about 80 Mb/s. Recall that 8K has 16 times the resolution of 1080p full HD, and you can see that a ton of computational power is required to make it all work.

HEVC Encoding was also in abundance on the show floor. Vitec had some super-small contribution H.265 encoders, and Haivision brought out a new Makito H.265 portable encoder. The Fraunhofer Institute had an impressive demo of contribution 4K video with HDR and wide color gamut encoded at 16 Mb/s, resulting in picture quality that would rival an Ultra HD Blu-ray disc streaming six times as fast.

The Fraunhofer Institute demonstrated 4K video with HDR and wide color gamut at an amazingly low 16 Mb/s. Image quality was spectacular (and yes, they did encode pieces of falling glitter in the video!).

The Fraunhofer Institute demonstrated 4K video with HDR and wide color gamut at an amazingly low 16 Mb/s. Image quality was spectacular (and yes, they did encode pieces of falling glitter in the video!).

 

Samsung will make its dynamic tone mapping scheme for HDR available to anyone who wants to use it - and has submitted it to SMPTE as a candidate HDR format.

Samsung will make its dynamic tone mapping scheme for HDR available to anyone who wants to use it – and has submitted it to SMPTE as a candidate HDR format.

 

Technicolor demonstrated their

Technicolor demonstrated their “HDR interpolated from SDR” process, and it works better than I expected.

Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) displays are gaining ground on LCD for studio and broadcast operations. Three different companies – Boland, Sony, and Fusion – were showing Ultra HD “client” and “reference” monitors based on a 55-inch RGBW panel manufactured by LG Display. Sony, of course, has 30-inch and 25-inch models, and some of the older 25-inch glass is being used in monitors made by companies like Flanders Scientific. Newer OLED panels use 10-bit drivers and can reproduce HDR signals with a wide color gamut.

High Dynamic Range was very much on people’s minds at NAB 2016. Dolby showed its Dolby Vision proprietary HDR system, and Technicolor privately demoed its dual SDR/HDR workflow and distribution scheme. Samsung was an expected visitor to the show floor – their booth featured a side-by-side comparison of SDR and HDR with dynamic tone mapping, a system they invented and will make available openly to anyone. It’s also a candidate for SMPTE HDR standards.

Super-fine pitch LED display walls are the next big thing, and I mean that – literally. Leyard, who bought Planar Systems last year, had an impressive 100-foot diagonal “8K’ LED video wall (no mention of the dot pitch, but it had to be around 1.2mm) that dominated the floor. An industry colleague remarked that the brightness and size of this screen would be sufficient to replace cinema screens and overcome reflective, contrast lowering glare. (Plus kick the electric bill up quite a few notches!)

Leyard also had a prototype 4K LED display wall using .9mm dot pitch LED emitters and not far away, Christie showed its Velvet series of LED walls, with dot pitches ranging from as coarse as 4mm (remember when that used to be a fine pitch?) to as sharp as .9mm. Top= put all of that into perspective, the first 42-inch and 50-inch plasma monitors that entered the U.S. market in the mid-1990s had a dot pitch of about 1mm, and 720p/768p plasma monitors were about .85mm. How far we’ve come!

Words don't express how spectacular Leyard/Planar's 100-foot 8K LED wall looked. You had to be there. (Next-generation cinema screens, anyone?)

Words don’t express how spectacular Leyard/Planar’s 100-foot 8K LED wall looked. You had to be there. (Next-generation cinema screens, anyone?)

 

Panasonic had a cool 8K

Panasonic had a cool 8K “solution,” consisting of a 55-inch 8K IPS monitor and recorder/player. Still thinking about which 4K gear to buy? Get with the program!

 

NEC and NTT both showed real-time 8K encoding using HEVC H.265. (Have we moved past 4K already? Wow...)

NEC and NTT both showed real-time 8K encoding using HEVC H.265. (Have we moved past 4K already? Wow…)

 

For just $2,000, this box will let you copy HEVC H.265 2K and 4K video to as many as 25 SD cards at once. How do they do it?

For just $2,000, this box will let you copy HEVC H.265 2K and 4K video to as many as 25 SD cards at once. How do they do it?

And there’s still very much a place for AVC H.264 encoding. Z3 had a super-tiny DME-10 H.264 encoder for streaming over IP, as did Vitec. Matrox unveiled their Monarch Lecture Capture system (also based on H.264), and NTT had an impressive multistream H.264 / IP encoder/decoder system out for inspection. Some of these boxes would actually fit in your shirt pocket – that’s how small they’ve become.

Of course, the wizards at Blackmagic Design were at it again. This time, they showed an H.265-based recorder/duplicator system that can write 25 SD cards simultaneously with HEVC 2K and 4K video and audio – just plug ‘em in, and go! Over at the Adtec booth, the Affiniti system held the spotlight. This fast, “universal” bus for encoders and decoders is designed to be configured and maintained by anyone with minimal technical knowledge. It uses an SFP backplane, an approach more manufacturers are taking to keep up with the ever-higher speeds of 4K and UHD+ data.

Finally, I just had to mention the “world’s smallest 8K display,” as seen in the NHK booth. Yep, it measures just 13 inches diagonally and has an amazing pixel density of 664 pixels per inch (ppi). This display, made by the Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Company of Japan, has a resolution of 7680 by 4320 pixels and employs a top-emission white OLED layer with color filters.  (Really???)

NAB 2014 In The Rear View Mirror

The 2014 NAB Show has come and gone, and although attendance was strong, this year’s edition didn’t have quite the buzz that I expected. Given all that is happening with UHDTV currently, that’s surprising: We are seeing a transformation of television into something very different from traditional models, including demonstrations of next-generation broadcast systems (ATSC 3.0), more powerful encoders (HEVC), and a migration to IP-based video production facilities (the cloud, AVB).

I spent three and a half days at the show, taking it all in while setting aside some time to present a paper at the Broadcast Engineering Conference on the current state of wireless AV connectivity and moderating a Wednesday Super Session on the future of video technology. If I really had to pick one word to characterize this year’s show, it would be “flux.”

Some trends were clear. The Japanese brands (aside from Canon) continue to down-size their booths as their business models shift away from traditional cameras, switchers, recording devices, and monitors. There were numerous companies showing cloud-based storage and media delivery over IT networks, and more than a few booths featured demos of HEVC H.265 encoding and decoding; most of it done with software.

Only a handful of booths emphasized monitors, and some of those had super-sized screens for digital signage out for inspection. In the north and central halls, you could find the traditional purveyors of broadcast transmitters, antennas, and coaxial cable, along with microphones and conventional audio products. But the emphasis seemed to be on “connected” anything – video, audio, cloud storage and delivery, and even wireless cameras for field acquisition and live events.

Given the sheer number of booths, it was difficult to compile a “pick hits” list, but I’ll give it a shot. To me, these companies/products/demos made the trip to Las Vegas worthwhile (and having traveled there over 70 times in the past 20 years, that’s saying a lot!).

Visionary Solutions may not be on your radar, but these clever folks are building some impressive hardware and software codecs at affordable prices. This year, they rolled out their PackeTV system, an end-to-end IP-based video delivery product with scheduling, recording, security, and delivery of real-time and recorded H.264 video, all rolled into one. The graphical user interface (GUI) for controlling the system was well-designed and easy to figure out.

Altera showed how easy it is to stream 12 G HD-SDI (4K) over a single piece of plain coaxial cable.

Altera showed how easy it is to stream 12 G HD-SDI (4K) over a single piece of plain coaxial cable.

 

LG and Gates Air demonstrated their vision for ATSC 3.0, using OFDM and HEVC in a standard TV channel.

LG and Gates Air demonstrated their vision for ATSC 3.0, using OFDM and HEVC in a standard TV channel.

LG and Gates Air had an impressive demo of an ATSC 3.0 concept broadcast. They combined Quad HD, 2K, and SD video programs into one 6 MHz channel, using HEVC encoding and decoding. The signals were encoded at 14, 1.6, and .98 Mb/s respectively, and the signal-to-noise threshold for the SD cast was just 1.5 dB. Multipath sets emulating mobile reception were also demonstrated with the 2K and SD streams holding up very well even at 50 mph.

Sony demonstrated a beautiful 30-inch OLED reference monitor that will soon take its place in the existing Trimaster series. This is a home-grown product and employs the same top-emission system with optical bandpass filters found on the 17-inch and 25-inch products. No price has been announced yet, and Sony has a real challenge in trying to figure out what that price should be as its customers aren’t willing to shell out 1990s bucks anymore for reference displays.

Altera had a clever demo of 12 Gb/s HD-SDI streaming over a piece of “conventional” coaxial cable. 3G HD-SDI has a nominal data cap of 3 Gb/s, so this demo used linked HD-SDI streams to hit the magic number (coincidentally, the data rate for a Quad HD video stream with a 60 Hz refresh rate and 4:2:2 coding). The coax link was 60 feet long and the transmission was flawless, aside from some hiccups on the PC playout server.

Ericsson showed there is more than one way to stream live 4K content. They set up a system that transported a live Quad HD video stream (3840x2160p/60) from a server in England, through satellite and fiber links, to the Ericsson and Intelsat booths at the show. But they used conventional H.264 encoding, breaking the 4K signal into 2K quadrants and using their Simulsync process to stich them together at the receiving end in a seamless presentation on an 84-inch monitor.

Ericsson stiched together four 2K image quadrants to stream this 4K image live from England.

Ericsson stiched together four 2K image quadrants to stream this 4K image live from England.

 

NHK's 4-pound Super Hi-Vision camera records video with 7680x4320 pixels @ 60 Hz and is a marvel.

NHK’s 4-pound Super Hi-Vision camera records video with 7680×4320 pixels @ 60 Hz and is a marvel.

NHK once again had their 8K Super Hi-Vision booth set up, but this time they were streaming live 8K (7680×4320) content from a new, compact 4-pound camera head. The signals were broadcast across the booth in two separate streams on a standard UHF channel, using 4096 QAM at 91 MB/s. Half of the data traveled as a horizontally-polarized signal and the other half as a vertically-polarized signal, both on UHF channel 36. (At that frequency, you can achieve about 20 dB separation between polarization angles.)

Haivision was demonstrating their Secure Reliable Transport (SRT) system over at the Renaissance Hotel. SRT is a hardware/software overlay for existing Haivision encoder/decoder products that is intended to better manage end-to-end streaming over public Internet connections. It offers adaptive streaming rates and two levels of encryption (AES 128-bit and 256-bit). SRT is positioned as an alternative to more expensive satellite backhaul links and dedicated MPLS point-to-point connections.

Korea’s Electronics and Telecommunications Institute (ETRI) had a small but intriguing demo of facial recognition linked to ad servers. The recognition system is built into a standard TV and has a range of about 10 feet, can discriminate between older and younger viewers, and will recognize a face turned 45 degrees to the right or left of center. An appropriate advertisement for the viewer is then displayed during a commercial break.

Fraunhofer HHI always has clever technology demos at NAB, and this year they spotlighted real-time software-based HEVC H.265 encoding and decoding at bit rates up to 40 Mb/s. They also showcased a real-time, hardware-based H.265 decoder using an Altera Stratix V FPGA. This decoder can handle bit rates to 80 MB/s and uses standard interfaces for set-top box designs. Fraunhofer also had an intriguing demo of surround sound playback for tablets in a nearby isolation booth.

BlackMagic's Ursa 4K camera costs only $6,000 (EF lens version)!

BlackMagic’s Ursa 4K camera costs only $6,000 (EF lens version)!

Sony's 30-inch Trimaster OLED looked great, but will its price tag break the bank?

Sony’s 30-inch Trimaster OLED looked great, but will its price tag break the bank?

No plasma? No problem for Panasonic, which showed new 84-inch and 98-inch 4K LCD monitors at the show.

No plasma? No problem for Panasonic, which showed new 84-inch and 98-inch 4K LCD monitors at the show.

BlackMagic Design continues to introduce powerful camera systems at bargain basement prices. Their new Ursa 4K field/studio camera has a huge 10-inch LCD monitor, touchscreen control, RAW and ProRes recorders, and upgradable Super 35mm shutter. The EF lens-compatible version lists at $5,995 while the PL-compatible version is $6,495. Their Studio Camera 4K, also equipped with the 10-inch LCD monitor and 12 GB HD-SDI connections, had an even more amazing price – $2,995.

Intel showed a clever use for Thunderbolt technology: Using a display interface for file exchanges. Thunderbolt runs on the DisplayPort physical layer and has a maximum speed of 20 Gb/s. By using a simple mini or regular DisplayPort cable; two MacBooks, two Windows laptops, or a MacBook/Win laptop can link together for file transfers, working just like a 10GigE network connection.

Panasonic showed it still has game after shutting down plasma manufacturing. Two new large digital 4K LCD displays were up and running in their booth – an 84-inch model (TH-84LQ7OU) and a 98-inch model (TH-98LQ7OU). We’ve seen the 84-inch LG Display LC glass cut before offered by other manufacturers, but the 98-inch hasn’t been in wide circulation. These will replace the 85-inch and 103-inch plasma monitors previously offered.

Finally, Christie had regular screenings to show off its new laser cinema projector system. This projector uses two sets of color primaries and matching eyewear, using wave division multiplexing to achieve a high degree of left eye/ right eye separation. According to a Christie rep, the system can achieve a brightness level of 72,000 lumens, and what was interesting to me was virtually no difference in image brightness through the glasses or without them.