Classic Product Review: Eviant T7 Card Portable Digital TV (2009)

It’s finally over. The United States has transitioned away from analog (NTSC) TV broadcasting after 60+ years, and moved to an all-digital system (8VSB) for full-power TV stations. (Low power and translator stations are still analog for a few more years.)

The NTIA converter box program is slowly winding down, and the latest estimates from Nielsen (June 21) showed that about 2.1 million homes, or 1.8% of all over-the-air TV viewers, were still unable or unprepared to watch digital TV.

The upside? Over 62 million converter box coupons had been mailed as of June 24, with 32 million redeemed and 24 million expired. And of course, every new TV set that supports NTSC reception must also support the ATSC DTV standard. So, we’re out of the woods with DTV reception issues, right?

Not quite. Everyone that ever bought a portable TV, from Sony Watchman LCD sets to tiny tabletop CRTs, just saw their investment reduced to zero on June 12. None of these legacy sets can receive ATSC signals, and it’s impractical to connect an NTIA converter box as a “retro move,” since there’s only one model that can run off batteries.

Never fear; Eviant is here! The company recently introduced two new LCD portable TV sets that are fully ATSC-complaint. Both sets are being featured as “hurricane TVs,” or sets you should keep around in case of a weather emergency.  But they’re also good-looking and small enough to use for everyday viewing on the go.

The T7 “Card” is the larger of the two models and the one that’s currently shipping to retail. According to the press release, “…The Eviant “Card” series 7-inch digital portable TV is available now in leading retail outlets including Kohls, JC Penny, Walmart.com, Target.com, Belks, Aafes, Bon Ton, D&H, HSN, Amazon.com, Shopko, Marsan and more with a MSRP of $169.99.”

Figure 1. Eviant’s T7 “Card” portable digital TV, shown in a white finish.

OUT OF THE BOX

Eviant’s T7 is about the size of a thick paperback book, and not all that heavy. It measures 7.3 inches wide by 5.7 inches high and is 1.1 inches deep. With the included lithium ion battery, it tips the scales at just over a half-pound. The supplied lithium ion battery charges up quickly (less than one hour), and is supposed to provide 2.5 hours of viewing time between charges.

Eviant has shown this TV with different color finishes. The official press photo shows a white housing, but my review sample was black and I also saw a red version at the CES summer line show. The shipping box shows pink, blue, and green as additional “skin” options, so you can knock yourself out with color coordination options!

The T7 isn’t just a TV. Eviant has also included a composite video input and mini audio connection to go along with it, plus a matching cable. If you have a portable media player with these connections, you can at least watch your videos on a larger screen. There’s also a mini-stereo headphone connection for private listening.

The whip antenna is actually a slide-on whip, which means you can pull it off and hook up other types of antennas to the threaded F connector. (Bravo, Eviant!) Eviant’s also included a little vertical UHF antenna with a magnetic base that you can stick just about anywhere.

The TV has a swing-out support stand for tabletop use. There’s even a credit card-sized remote control that has extremely limited functionality — basically, you can adjust volume and channel, plus access the menu. There isn’t even a power button on the remote (strange!), but there is a “channel +10” button for moving around faster.

The LCD display measures 7” and has a working resolution of 480 x 234 pixels, so don’t go crazy expecting to see HDTV on this product. Remember — it’s a portable TV, first and foremost. Besides, trying to put a 7” HD display in a product like this would be overkill.

Figure 2. The T7 (and its “coming in the 3rd quarter” 4.3” companion) grabbed more than a few eyeballs at the CES NY Line Shows in early June.

MENUS AND OPERATION

Eviant has included a surprising detailed menu. There are five sections you can diddle around with — Picture, where you can select the AV input or regular TV mode, plus choose between Personal, Dynamic, Standard, and Soft image presets, and fine-tune contrast, brightness, and color.

The Audio menu is where you can adjust balance, plus select the preferred language when more than one audio track is available. The Clock menu lets you set the OSD duration in 15-second increments, plus toggle to your time zone and switch Daylight Savings Time on and off.

The Tools menu is where you can set the OSD transparency (on or off), color temperature (Warm, Normal, Cool), and the picture Zoom mode for when 4:3 content is displayed on the screen. The default (factory) setting for this control is Wide, but you can switch everything (including HD broadcasts) to 4:3. Or, you can just select Auto, and let the T7 provide the correct screen size, based on the video format being transmitted.

The last menu, Channel, is where you’ll scan for ATSC and NTSC channels. Believe it or not, the T7 will also scan for and receive NTSC and QAM digital cable channels (handy for when there’s a cable TV feed near your campsite, I guess?). The NTSC support means you’ll still be able to pick up local community TV stations, which converter boxes won’t receive.

You can initiate a general channel scan in this menu, and also an overlay scan to pick up any channels you may have missed the first time around. This secondary scan is also handy if you rotate antennas or travel, and don’t want to lose digital TV channels you captured previously.

PERFORMANCE

I first tested the T7 by connecting it to my attic antenna system, which feeds my home office. It takes a while to scan — about two and a half minutes to saunter through channels 2 through 69 — but once done, works as well as any PC-based digital TV tuner I’ve tested. As you step through channels, you’ll see a blue display in the upper right corner of the screen showing you each station’s virtual channel number and call sign.

One thing you won’t see on the T7 is PSIP. For whatever reason (and it may be that cost is the reason), there is no way to display electronic program guide information on the T7. It will, of course, display closed captions. But the only way you’ll know what you’re watching is to change the channel up and down to get the virtual channel display to appear briefly onscreen again.

The next step was to connect the T7 to my rooftop antenna via a splitter, with the other leg feeding a Zenith DTT901 DTV converter box. My goal here was to see how the two compared in terms of sensitivity and ability to handle multipath.

The answer? They were equivalent in performance on both close-in and distant DTV channels. I installed a 20 dB step attenuator in line to both sets and began cranking back signals 1 dB at a time until they started to break up or drop out. That point was exactly the same for every channel on both the T7 and the DTT901( the latter is effectively running Generation 6 8VSB receiver technology).

An inquiry to Eviant’s PR firm came back with the response that the receiver’s chipset is made by MStar Semiconductor of Taiwan, and is the MSD110. From my tests, it appeared functionally the equivalent of the LG 8VSB front end used in the DTT901.

The next test took place during my Super Tuesday session at InfoComm. The session, attended by 180+ people, was held in Room 303 of the Orlando Convention Center. I scanned for channels and picked up over 25 different NTSC and ATSC programs, most of which played just fine without any dropouts, no matter where I placed the TV in the room. (This location is over 20 miles distant from the Orlando TV transmitters.)

Figure 3. Yep, I was able to watch snippets of “Wipeout” on WABC-DT, while zipping along in a double-decker train through the Jersey Meadows!

Figure 3. Yep, I was able to watch snippets of “Wipeout” on WABC-DT, while zipping along in a double-decker train through the Jersey Meadows!

The final test was to take the T7 into New York City for some press meetings. One was uptown at the Hilton Times Square, and the others were at the Metropolitan Pavilion on 18th Street. Reception was perfect on 42nd Street by Times Square on all channels, including high-band VHF channels 7 (WABC), 11 (WPIX), and 13 (WNET). Reception deep in the Hilton was spotty in places, but still better than I expected.

Later on that afternoon, I plunked the T7 on the wooden bar of an Irish pub on 18th Street, as our group tossed down a quick round of Harp lagers before Pepcomm’s Digital Experience opened. Once again, I experienced flawless reception of all NYC DTV channels with the whip first extended halfway, and then fully extended. (The T7’s whip is actually more resonant at UHF frequencies when somewhat collapsed).

Just for laughs, I pulled the T7 out seconds after my westbound, double-decker NJ Transit Midtown Direct train exited the New Jersey side of the Hudson River tunnel. I flipped it on and was able to watch quite a bit of programming on WABC-7 and WPIX-11, even with the train moving at a pretty good clip — 50+ miles per hour. I could see the Empire State Building through the opposite train windows for a good part of the trip, so I figured it was worth a try.

Of course, signals were lost completely when we went through the Secaucus train station and also when we crossed lift bridges and went under other tracks. But the video and audio were there about 70% of the time. And once the train pulled to a complete stop in Newark to take on and pick up passengers, VHF and UHF DTV reception was rock steady.

CONCLUSION

Eviant’s T7 delivers the goods. It has an excellent DTV receiver front end and worked very well indoors in what are difficulty high-multipath environments (Times Square, 18th Street, and the Orlando Convention Center). Audio is surprisingly loud for such a small TV, although frequency response is limited. Images were very clear and crisp, even at low resolution.

What I didn’t like: Even with a +10 channel jump button, it takes a while to move from one channel to another. There should also be a power switch on the remote control. And I’d like to see at least a “mini program guide” button included, so you at least find out what the heck program you’re watching.

The time (broadcast by every digital TV station) isn’t even displayed, unless you go into the menu. Oops! That info would be very helpful on a “hurricane TV.” Oh, and by the way, Eviant — how about a car charger adapter for this TV, in case of a power failure that lasts more than 2.5 hours?

In any event, the T7’s faults aren’t deal breakers. From what I’ve been told, pricing is very competitive on this product — a quick check online shows Target pricing them at $149.95, and Amazon had the black version listed as low as $119. For that kind of money, you can’t go wrong.

SPECIFICATIONS

Eviant T7 Portable Digital TV
MSRP: $169.99

Specifications:
Dimensions: 7.3” W x 5.7” H x 1.1” D
Weight: .55 pounds*
RF Input: “F” connector with fitted collapsible whip
TV Systems: NTSC, ATSC, QAM
Video inputs: (1) Mini-plug
Audio inputs: (1) stereo mini-plug
Audio output: 8-ohm stereo mini plug
* Owner’s manual says .55 pounds, press release says 1.39 pounds

Available from:

Eviant
1661 Fairplex drive
La Verne, CA 91750

www.eviant.com
(866) 935-4396