Category: The Front Line

InfoComm 2018 In The Rear View Mirror

If you managed to make it out to this year’s running of InfoComm, you might have summarized your trip to colleagues with these talking points:

(a) LED displays, and

(b) AV-over-IT.

Indeed; it was impossible to escape these two trends. LED walls and cubes were everywhere in the Las Vegas Convention Center, in many cases promoted by a phalanx of Chinese brands you’ve likely never heard of. But make no mistake about it – LEDs are the future of displays, whether they are used for massive outdoor signage or compact indoor arrays.

With the development of micro LED technology, we’re going to see an expansion of LEDs into televisions, monitors, and even that smart watch on your wrist. (Yes, Apple is working on micro LEDs for personal electronics.)

Projector manufacturers are understandably nervous about the inroads LEDs are making into large venues. Indeed; this author recently saw Paul Simon’s “farewell tour” performance at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, and the backdrop was an enormous widescreen LED wall that provided crystal-clear image magnification (very handy when concertgoers around you are up and dancing, blocking your view of the stage).

 

As for the other talking point – well, it was impossible to avoid in conversations at InfoComm. Between manufacturers hawking their “ideal” solutions for compressing and streaming audio and video and all of the seminars in classrooms and booths, you’d think that AV-over-IT is a done deal.

The truth is a little different. Not all installations are looking to route signals through a 10 Gb/s Cisco switch. In fact, a brand-spanking-new studio built for ESPN in lower Manhattan, overlooking the East River and the Brooklyn Bridge, relies on almost 500 circuits of 3G SDI video through an enormous router. Any network-centric signal distribution within this space is mostly for IT traffic.

That’s not to say that installers are poo-pooing AV-over-IT and the new SMPTE 2110 standards for network distribution of deterministic video. It’s still early in the game and sometimes tried-and-tested signal distribution methods like SDI are perfectly acceptable, especially in the case of this particular facility with its 1080p/60 backbone.

Even so, the writing on the all couldn’t be more distinct with respect to LEDs and network distribution of AV. But there were other concerns at the show that didn’t receive nearly as much media attention.

At the IMCCA Emerging Trends session on Tuesday, several presentations focused on interfacing humans and technology. With “OK Google” and Alexa all the rage, discussions focused on how fast these consumer interfaces would migrate to AV control systems. An important point was made about the need for two-factor authentication – simple voice control might not be adequately secure for say, a boardroom in a large financial institution.

What would the second factor be? Facial recognition? (This was a popular suggestion.) Fingerprints? Retinal scans? A numeric code that could be spoken or entered on a keypad? The name of your favorite pet? Given that hackers in England recently gained access to a casino’s customer database via an Internet-connected thermometer in a fish tank, two-factor authentication for AV control systems doesn’t seem like a bad idea.

Another topic of discussion was 8K video. With a majority of display manufacturers showing 4K LCD (and in some cases OLED) monitors in Vegas, the logical question was: Could resolutions be pushed higher? Of course, the answer is a resounding “yes!”

Display analysts predict there will be over 5 million 8K televisions shipped by 2022 and we’re bound to see commercial monitors adapted from those products. But 8K doesn’t have to be achieved in a single, stand-alone display: With the advent of smaller 4K monitors (some as small as 43 inches), it is a simple matter to tile a 2×2 array to achieve 7680×4320 pixels. And there doesn’t appear to be a shortage of customers for such a display, especially in the command and control and process control verticals.

The other conversations of interest revolved around the need for faster wireless. We now have 802.1ac channel bonding, with 802.11ax on the horizon. For in-room super-speed WiFi, 802.11ad provides six channels at 60 GHz, each 2 GHz wide or 100x the bandwidth of individual channels at 2.4 and 5 GHz.

But wise voices counsel to pay attention to 5G mobile networks, which promise download speeds of 1 Gb/s. While not appropriate for in-room AV connectivity, 5G delivery of streaming video assets to classrooms and meetings is inevitable. Some purveyors of wireless connectivity services like AT&T and Verizon insist that 5G could eventually make WiFi obsolete. (That’s a bit of a stretch, but this author understands the motivation for making such a claim.)

The point of this missive? Simply that our industry is headed for some mind-boggling changes in the next decade. Networked AV, LEDs, 8K video and displays, multi-factor authentication for control systems, and super-fast wireless connections are all in the wings.

And if you were observant at InfoComm, you know it’s coming…and quickly.

Measuring Up With DisplayHDR

For the past 16 years, the High Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) has ruled the roost for display connections, pushing aside VGA at first and then DVI on everything from televisions and Blu-ray players to laptop computers and camcorders. It’s evolved numerous times from a basic plug-and-play interface for televisions and AV receivers to a high-speed transport system for 4K and ultimately 8K video. Ironically, HDMI is often the input and output connection for video encoders and decoders that, in theory, could displace it from the market altogether.

But there are other players in the interfacing market, and that would be the folks at the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA), who developed and periodically update DisplayPort. First launched in 2006, DisplayPort was intended to replace the old analog VGA connector with a newer, 100%-digital version that could handle many times the bandwidth of an XGA (1024×768) or UXGA (1600×1200) video signal.

Other forward-looking features included direct display drivers (no need for a video card), support for optical fiber, multiplexing with USB and other data bus formats, and even a wireless specification (it never really caught on). Like HDMI, DP had its “mini” and “micro” versions (Mini DP and Mobility DP).

In recent years, VESA stayed current by upping the speed limit from 21.6 to 32 gigabits per second (Gb/s), supporting the USB 3.0 Alternate Mode, adding some cool bells and whistles like simultaneous multi-display output, adopting the first compression system for display signals (Display Stream Compression), recognizing high dynamic range metadata formats, and even accepting color formats other than RGB.

Best of all, there continue to be no royalties associated with DP use, unlike HDMI. The specification is available to anyone who’s interested, unlike HDMI. And DP was ready to support deep color and high frame rate 4K video as recently as 2013, unlike HDMI.

However…unlike HDMI, DisplayPort has had limited success penetrating the consumer electronics display interfacing market. While some laptop manufacturers have adopted the interface, along with commercial AV monitors and video cards for high-performance PCs, HDMI is still the undisputed king of the hill when it comes to plugging any sort of media device into a display.

Even long-time supporters of DP have switched allegiances. Apple, known for using Mini DisplayPort on its MacBook laptops, is now adding HDMI connections. Lenovo, another DP stalwart, is doing the same thing on its newer ThinkPad laptops.

One of the many DisplayHDR-certified monitors in VESA’s booth at CES 2018.

But VESA has a few more tricks up its sleeve. Earlier this year at CES, VESA had several stands in their booth demonstrating a new set of standards for high dynamic range and wide color gamuts on computer monitors – specifically, those using LCD technology. DisplayHDR calls out specific numbers that must be achieved to qualify for DisplayHDR 400, DisplayHDR 600, and DisplayHDR 1000 certification.

Those numbers fall into the categories of 10% full white, full screen white “flash,” and full screen white “sustained” operation, minimum black level, minimum color gamut, minimum color bit depth, and black-to-white transition time. With interest in HDR video growing, the DisplayHDR specifications are an attempt to get around vague descriptions of things like color range (“70% of NTSC!”) and contrast ratios that don’t specify how the measurements were taken.

And this is actually a good thing. In the CE world, the UHD Alliance has a vague set of minimum requirements for a TV to qualify as high dynamic range. Compared to the more stringent DisplayHDR requirements, the UHD Alliance specs are equivalent to asking if you can walk and chew gum at the same time. Whereas HDMI version 2.0 (currently the fastest available) can transport an Ultra HD signal with 8-bit RGB color safely at 60 Hz, that’s setting the bar kinda low in our opinion.

In contrast, DisplayPort 1.3 and 1.4 (adds HDR metadata and support for 4:2:0 and 4:2:2 color) aren’t even breathing hard with a 12-bit RGB Ultra HD video stream refreshed at 60 Hz. And that means a computer display certified to meet one of the DisplayHDR standards can actually accept a robust HDR signal. (Note that VESA isn’t choosing sides here – DisplayHDR-certified screens can also use HDMI connections, but signal options are limited by HDMI 2.0’s top speed of 18 Gb/s.) You can learn more about DisplayHDR here.

With HDMI 2.1 looming on the horizon – a new version of the interface that liberally borrows from DisplayPort architecture – VESA will certainly have its work cut out. The accelerated trend to 4K and ultimately 8K imaging will help, as DP can get to the faster data rates more quickly than HDMI. And the DisplayHDR standards aren’t just fluff – they’re also a way to expand awareness of the DisplayPort brand.

Heads Up! Here Comes 8K TV (or, The Case Of The Amazing Vanishing Pixels)

Yes, you read that right: 8K displays are coming. For that matter, 8K broadcasting has already been underway in Japan since 2012, and several companies are developing 8K video cameras to be shown at next month’s NAB show in Las Vegas.

“Hold on a minute!” you’re probably thinking. “I don’t even own a 4K TV yet. And now they’re already on the endangered species list?”

Well, not exactly. But two recent press releases show just how crazy the world of display technology has become.

The first release came from Insight Media in February and stated that, “The 2020 Tokyo Olympics will be a major driver in the development of 8K infrastructure with Japanese broadcaster NHK leading efforts to produce and broadcast Olympic programming to homes…cameras from Hitachi, Astrodesign, Ikegami, Sharp and Sony address the many challenges in capturing 8K video…the display industry plans for massive expansion of Gen 10.5 capacity, which will enable efficient production of 65″ and 75″ display panels for both LCD and OLED TV…. sales of 8K Flat Panel TVs are expected to increase from 0.1 million in 2018 to 5.8 million in 2022, with China leading the way representing more than 60% of the total market during this period.”

Read it again. Almost 6 million 8K LCD and OLED TVs are expected to be sold four years from now, and over 3 million of those sales will be in China.

But there’s more. Analyst firm IHS Markit issued their own forecasts for 8K TV earlier this month, predicting that, While ultra-high definition (UHD) panels are estimated to account for more than 98 percent of the 60-inch and larger display market in 2017, most TV panel suppliers are planning to mass produce 8K displays in 2018. The 7680 x 4320-pixel resolution display is expected to make up about 1 percent of the 60-inch and larger display market this year and 9 percent in 2020.”

According to HIS Markit, companies with skin in the 8K game include Innolux, which will supply 65-inch LCD panels to Sharp for use in consumer televisions and in commercial AV displays. Meanwhile, Sharp – which had previously shown an 85-inch 8K TV prototype – will ramp up production of a new 70-inch 8K LCD display (LV-70X500E) in their Sakai Gen 10 LCD plant. This display was shown in Sharp’s booth at ISE, along with their new 8K video camera.

Sharp showed this 8K camera (BC-B60A) at ISE…

 

…feeding this 70-inch 8K LCD monitor (LV-70X500E), a new glass cut from the Sakai Gen 10 fab.

Sony and Samsung are also expected to launch 8K LCD TVs this year. Both companies showed prototypes at CES with Samsung’s offering measuring about 85 inches. Sony’s prototype also measured 85 inches but included micro light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in the backlight to achieve what Sony described as “full high dynamic range,” achieving peak (specular) brightness of 10,000 nits. (That’ll give you a pretty good sunburn!)

Oher players in 8K include LG Display, who already announced an 88-inch 8K OLED TV prior to CES, and Chinese fabricators BOE, AUO, and China Electronics Corporation (CEC). What’s even more interesting is that some of these 8K LCD and OLED panels will be equipped with indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) switching transistors.

No, IGZO isn’t a cure for aging. But what it does is provide much higher pixel density in a given screen size with lower power consumption. More importantly, it will allow these 8K TVs to refresh their pictures as fast as 120 Hz – double the normal refresh rate we use today. And that will be important as High Frame Rate (HFR) video production ramps up.

LG Display’s 88-inch 8K OLED display was a real eye-catcher at CES 2018.

Predictably, prices for TVs and monitors using panels with 4K resolution are collapsing. In the AV channel, 4K (Ultra HD) displays are only beginning to show up in product lines, but manufacturers are well aware of pricing trends with Ultra HD vs. Full HD (1920x1080p). With some consumer models now selling for as little as $8 per diagonal inch, the move from Full HD to 4K / Ultra HD will pick up lots of steam.

And with 8K displays now becoming a ‘premium’ product, 4K / Ultra HD will be the ‘everyday’ or mainstream display offering in screen sizes as small as 40 inches and as large as – well, you name it. We’ve already seen 84-inch, 88-inch, and 98-inch commercial displays, and prototypes as large as 120 inches – yes, 10’ of diagonal screen, wrap your head around that – have been exhibited at CES and other shows.

We saw quite a few demonstrations of 4K commercial displays at ISE and expect to see a whole lot more at InfoComm in June, along with the inevitable price wars. And there will be the usual “my encoder handles 4K better than yours with less latency” battles, shoot-outs, and arguments. But that could ultimately turn out to be the appetizer in this full-course meal.

For companies manufacturing signal distribution and switching equipment, 4K / Ultra HD already presents us with a full plate. 8K would be too much to bite off at present! Consider that an 8K/60 video signal using 12-bit RGB color requires a data rate approaching 100 gigabits per second (Gb/s), as compared to a 12-bit, 60 Hz Full HD signal’s rate of about 6 Gb/s, and you can see we will have some pretty steep hills to climb to manage 8K.

Distributing 8K over a network will be equally challenging and will require switching speeds somewhere north of 40 Gb/s even for a basic form of 8K video, which (we assume) will also incorporate high dynamic range and wide color gamuts. 40 Gb/s switches do exist but are pricey and would require 8K signals to be compressed by at least 25% to be manageable. And they’d certainly use optical fiber for all their connections.

To be sure, 4K / Ultra HD isn’t on the endangered species just yet. (For that matter, you can still buy Full HD monitors and TVs, if that’s any comfort.) But whether it makes sense or not – or whether we’re ready or not – it’s “full speed ahead” for 8K displays as we head into the third decade of the 21st century…

The 2018 HPA Tech Retreat: Digital In The Desert

2018 brought a new venue (The J.W. Marriott) for the annual Hollywood Professional Association Technology Retreat and a program chock-full of interesting talks, not to mention the usual enormous Innovation Zone (formerly the Demo Room). I first attended the Retreat in 2002 out of simple curiosity, and back then there were perhaps 100 – 120 in attendance. Zoom ahead to 2018, and well over 600 people made the trek to Palm Desert.

The primary focus of HPA has been and continues to be post-production, and in recent years there have been numerous presentations on managing workflows, metadata, and “director’s intent.” So it went this year, with an entire section of the Innovation Zone devoted to the Interchange Media Format (IMF, not the International Monetary Fund).

But there’s more to the conference than workflows. I can’t remember precisely when I started doing this presentation, but I attempt to recap my impressions of the Consumer Electronics Show every year – and do it in exactly 30 minutes. Jim Burger from Thomson Coburn opens the first day with a review of what’s happening in Washington DC with regard to copyrights and other legal issues, and we both try to spice things up with a little humor here and there. (Very little…)

Over 600 people attended this year’s Tech Retreat.

Of course, there are other things to talk about, such as the emergence of solid-state cinema screens using light-emitting diodes and how likely they are to replace conventional digital cinema projectors. Peter Lude of Mission Rock Digital covered this topic nicely and it appears we’re not quite there yet, although it’s been my experience that Asian countries are often happy to dive into new cinema technologies where we in the U.S. and Canada would proceed more cautiously.

High dynamic range (HDR) is another hot topic, as you might imagine. One of the highlights of my talk was how cheap Ultra HDTVs have become, with certain models available for as little as $8 per diagonal inch and equipped with basic HDR (HDR 10 static metadata) for just $1 more per diagonal inch. My conclusion was that the economic impact of televisions on the CE world has been greatly diminished – televisions are commodities now, and the average consumer buys TVs these days by looking for the best price on the biggest screen they can fit at home.

Of course, my observations stirred up a bunch of discussions and counter-arguments, the strongest coming from representatives of Sony. From my perspective, no one hurts themselves by waiting a bit longer to invest in an HDR TV, as there are still a few bugs in the system. Not all HDR formats are supported on all models, and some content players and TVs don’t establish HDMI connections correctly, enabling a lower bit rate connection and blocking HDR signals –  something that would drive the average viewer crazy.

HDR was a hot topic at the Retreat and Panasonic demonstrated dual HDR (left) and SDR (right) output from their newest 4K camera.

The Sony camp argued that it has never been a better time to buy an Ultra HDTV with HDR, and in fact older models might actually out-perform newer models as the race to lower manufacturing costs could sacrifice quality. However; Sony’s own Z9 LCD Ultra HDTV, held up as a paragon of HDR playback (albeit a very expensive one at $9,000 originally), has been discontinued and the likely cause is far lower prices for OLED and quantum dot-equipped LCD TVs. And they did admit that there are still ample problems with HDMI interconnections and clock rate detection that adversely impact Ultra HD playback on current models of televisions.

The elephant in the room is that there isn’t enough HDR content to watch in the first place. Yes, Comcast provided 4K coverage of the Olympics via streaming connections, some of it with HDR. And DirecTV (AT&T) carried the Pebble Beach Pro-Am in 4K with HDR. But the pickings are still slim. An informal show of hands after Day 2 seemed to confirm my advice to sit on one’s hands – more attendees who were considering an Ultra HDTV with HDR purchase seemed happy to wait it out a bit longer than those who just had to jump in and get a set today.

I don’t know of too many people who have picked up Ultra HD Blu-ray players to watch HDR content, either (I haven’t) but I am aware of a couple of instances where said players didn’t work correctly with compatible TVs. In one case, the manufacturer of the TV and UHD BD player were the same! But given how low prices have dropped for HDR-equipped sets, it appears that HDR will become a standard feature soon enough, just like the late, lamented 3D did. And UHD BD players will come down in price to match conventional Full HD models soon enough.

Thursday’s session opened with a panel discussion on HDR “flavors” and featured participants from Dolby, Sony, Samsung, and the BBC. It was timely: A recent article in the Hollywood Reporter talked about people getting confused with all of the different HDR formats – HDR 10, Dolby Vision, Hybrid Log Gamma, and HDR 10+ (Samsung’s take on dynamic metadata). So far, I know of only one manufacturer (LG) that supports four HDR formats (HDR 10, Dolby Vision, HLG, and Technicolor, which is more of a transport than a display format). In theory, the TV should recognize these formats automatically, but consumers may perceive we’re in the midst of another “format war” like we were with Blu-ray and HD DVD ten years ago.

This panel was followed by another titled, “Establishing Metadata Guidelines for Downstream Image Presentation Management on Consumer Displays.” In other words, maintaining creative intent all the way through to the television. Another panel on Day 2 discussed the Academy Color Exchange System (ACES), which was developed to ensure color volume and data didn’t change from the camera through post and mastering. There is a never-ending discussion about preserving the director’s and colorists’ intent to the TV screen, but that’s much easier said than done – TV manufacturers have very different axes to grind.

While we already have a system to deliver HDR metadata to televisions using CTA 861.3 extensions, my thought was that perhaps the Cinema/Movie/User picture settings on Ultra HDTVs could be configured to also recognize ACES metadata and provide that more accurate cinema experience. This would involve encoding that data into Blu-ray discs and also streaming content, but it shouldn’t be impossible to pull off – and would actually provide some value to manufacturers, especially if they could re-label this setting “Academy” instead of Cinema or Movie.

I hosted three breakfast roundtables during the conference on OLED technology, HDR signal interfacing, and gadget fatigue. And the last roundtable was the most intriguing, as my colleagues talked about mixed experiences with Alexa, Siri, and Google, using flip phones more than smart phones, trying out VR goggles that are now gathering dust, preferring hardcover and softcover books to tablets, and just trying to disconnect whenever possible.

The fact is; we live in a world of abundant, cheap electronics. It’s hard to disconnect from all of this stuff as it’s become an integral part of our lives, but it appears some of us are trying to maintain some separation and are questioning why everything in our lives needs to be connected, as we were repeatedly told at CES 2018. I can say that a majority of HPA attendees don’t think it’s a good idea to have everything in their house connected to the Internet, based on a show of hands after Day 1.

If you’ve never attended the Tech Retreat, you should. The general sessions are thought-provoking and the sidebar conversations and informal discussions (including the breakfast roundtables) are well worth the trip. I’m looking forward to the 2019 Retreat, at which I will likely report once again on my impressions of CES….

ISE 2018 In the Rear View Mirror

I just returned from a week in Amsterdam in what is now the largest AV trade show in the world, Integrated Systems Europe. The organizers claim that 70,000 people attend this event and that number is certainly believable: The RAI exhibition center had to erect two additional temporary “bubble” halls to hold all of the manufacturers, and the foot traffic was crazy in the main halls.

If there was an overarching theme to the show, it had to be the migration of AV signal distribution to IT networks. Booth after booth featured exhibits of video encoders, demonstrations of compression and picture quality vs. latency, giant signs extolling the virtues of video and audio distributed over 1 Gb and 10 Gb networks, and plenty of “us vs. them” comparisons.

There are so many players in the AV-over-IT world that you need a scorecard to keep track of them. Of course, everyone has their own “special sauce” when it comes to sampling, compressing, and recovering video (audio is easy!), and those “us vs. them” demonstrations usually featured (a) a live video source, (b) that same video as processed through the manufacturer’s encoding system, and (c) that same video as processed through the competition’s video encoding system.

Crestron claims near-zero latency for their DM NVX codec, compared to SVSI…

 

…except that the SDVoE exhibit showed that DM NVX does have latency – at least, more than SDVoE’s Blue River system.

Latency was a big topic at the show. It’s defined as the time delay between a frame of source video and that same frame of video after recovery from a decoder and is typically measured in milliseconds. For some reason, the AV industry is obsessed with “near zero” latency in AV installations and I lost track of all the booths claiming their products had “little,” “near zero,” and “almost none.”

Crestron had a large exhibit in their booth, touting their DM NVX system for signal distribution and control over IT using 1 Gb network switches while maintaining image quality. To drive the point home, they had a side-by-side comparison of SVSI and HDBaseT transmission with DM NVX to show that it had the lowest latency. Time code was shown on all displays and visitors were encouraged to “take a picture with your phone” to confirm their claims.

At the back of another hall, the SDVoE Alliance had an exhibit saying, “Not so fast!” Their demo compared a video source to DM NVX and an SDVoE Blue River NT codec and appeared to show that the Crestron product had higher latency (and once again, visitors were encouraged to take a picture and confirm what they saw). The big difference? SDVoE promotes the use of 10 Gb switches instead of 1 Gb switches (a point I concur with) so even signals with 4K resolution can travel with light compression.

I’m not sure what codec Crestron is using, but the Blue River codec is adapted from VESA’s Display Stream Compression (DSC), an entropy-based compression scheme with extremely low latency that is well-suited to packing down 4K and even 8K signals.

Epson was mapping images onto a projector (right) that was projecting onto a large screen (left). Did you get all that?

 

Optoma is now in the LED display wall business.

Consider that HDMI version 2.0 is only fast enough to transport 2160p/60 with 8-bit RGB color and you can see the advantage of 1.5:1 and 2:1 compression to increase color bit depth – essential to distributing signals with high dynamic range and wide color gamuts, not to mention high frame rate video. (For those keeping score at home, a 2160p/60 signal with 10-bit RGB color requires a data rate of 21.39 Gb/s, so with a little over 2:1 compression, it will pass through a 10 Gb/s network switch.)

This looming battle between codecs and Valens’ HDBaseT format will only heat up as more manufacturers adopt ‘pure’ AV-over-IT solutions. HDBaseT is still limited to 328 feet of cable length and data rates of 10.2 Gb/s, although Aurora Multimedia claims their IPBaseT hybrid product can push HDBaseT speeds much higher and accommodate 4K signals with deeper color. Further confusing the issue is the TiCo (Tiny Codec) which is based on JPEG XS, a “mezzanine” codec that will permit lighter compression of video so that it can travel through a 10 Gb network.

Another trend was the explosive growth of LED signage. Hall 2 had so many Chinese LED manufacturers that I couldn’t keep track of the all. The “hot” technology nowadays is micro LED, or LED pixel elements with a pitch less than 1 millimeter. Consider that a 50-inch plasma TV from 1998 had a pixel resolution of 1280×768 or about 1.2mm, and we can now install a wall-sized LED display with a dot pitch approaching .8mm.

There’s no question that these products are having an impact on the projector industry. As I’ve mentioned in the past, every concert I’ve attended in the past 3 years has relied on large LED displays to show live video and graphics – none of them employed projectors, so far as I can remember. One consequence of this trend is that projector manufacturers including Barco, Christie, Panasonic, and Digital Projection chose to emphasize LED displays and walls in their booths (like covering their bets) alongside their flagship products. (Even Optoma did this!)

Absen had a humongous booth at ISE and is becoming a major player in LED signage in the U.S.

 

4K LCDs are here for digital signage and Leyard was promoting a full line of them.

In contrast, the challenge for Chinese LED display companies is that no one really knows anything about them, not to mention how reliable their products are. So now we’re seeing familiar names from the U.S. AV industry showing up in engineering, marketing, and sales positions for the likes of Leyard/Planar, Unilumen, Absen, and other brands, a strategy meant to bridge the familiarity gaps and increase sales.

Another area of interest is collaboration. Mersive’s Solstice had an exhibit that stressed the importance of analytics, gathering data on who was logged into a presentation sharing system and when. Kramer’s VIA product also has an analytics function and it looks like other companies are heading in that direction. DVDO, formerly owned by Silicon Image / Lattice, is independent again and has joined the collaboration space with their Tile product. This can stream and tile five independent sources of Full HD video, not to mention share screens and cast.

You wouldn’t think of “Sharp” and “broadcast video camera” in the same sentence – yet, here they are with exactly that.

 

Panasonic showed an 8K workspace, made up of two side-by-side 4K LCD monitors equipped with touchscreen overlays.

The 800-pound gorilla in this space is, of course, Barco’s ClickShare. There are three iterations of the product, with the top-of-the-line CSE 800 allowing 8 shared screens at the same time through dual 4K display outputs. Crestron had a demo of AirMedia that claimed higher bandwidth than Solstice (1.6 Mb/s), full network security, .05 seconds latency (there’s that latency thing again!), and enterprise management software.

There was even a minor controversy at ISE. Barco posted a press release stating that they had “instructed bailiffs to approach the booth of Kindermann and collect evidence of its Klick & Show wireless presentation system present at the show” to be used in patent infringement suits. Apparently, the same thing happened last year with Kanex Pro at ISE. What really happened was that nothing was taken from Kindermann’s booth, but the press release did create some discussion.

The continuing decrease in hardware costs are the real elephant in the room. Consider that it was possible to buy a 50-inch RCA 4K TV at Shop Rite the week before the Super Bowl, and you can clearly see just how quickly value is being sucked out of consumer and commercial AV gear. In addition to the “hang and bang” projector market getting hammered by ever-cheaper and larger LCD displays (which are moving quickly to 4K resolution exclusively), AV signal management equipment – switchers, distribution amplifiers, and extenders – is susceptible to this ‘dollar store’ trend as more and more brands come to market with hardware largely manufactured in Asia.

The AV-over-IT business is a clear example. Most IT products are sold through distribution and it’s likely that most AV products will follow that path in the near future. The core products for any AV-over-IT installation are encoders and decoders, and more than a few products I saw are being sourced from China. Indeed, more than one booth at ISE featured the same exact product in a different housing, the only differential being price and perhaps a few bells and whistles.

One thing is for certain. Many large companies who have ruled the AV roost for decades are finding themselves in an unfamiliar position these days, trying to keep up with the pack as the migration to AV-over-IT continues. We’ll see how the trend plays out at InfoComm in June…